Books by Allan Massie

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 20, 2011

"A palatable history lesson that might help untangle the royal lineage web for American readers."
A well-fashioned history of the remarkable Scottish monarchs. Read full book review >
ARTHUR THE KING by Allan Massie
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2004

"Some will quibble at the Da Vinci Code-like deconstruction of papacy and Church, but most will applaud a brisk, elegant narrative free of the New Age gibberish that infects most modern Arthurian sagas."
Historical novelist Massie unrolls the familiar knightly yarns with some fresh, unusual twists. Read full book review >
THE EVENING OF THE WORLD by Allan Massie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"A good portrait of an often-overlooked period, Massie's account takes a you-are-there approach that ends up feeling more like Forrest Gump than I, Claudius."
The first of a planned historical trilogy is set in the last days of the Roman Empire as Massie (Tiberius, 1993, etc.) follows the wanderings of a young nobleman in service to the Emperor. Read full book review >
TIBERIUS by Allan Massie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"More a sententious plod."
Another fictionalized biography from British veteran Massie of an ancient great (Let the Emperor Speak, 1987, etc.)—though, here, the Roman emperor Tiberius sounds more like a US president complaining about Congress than an imperial swashbuckler. Read full book review >
THE SINS OF THE FATHER by Allan Massie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1992

"The sins of the fathers are indeed visited with a vengeance more plot- than character-driven, and, despite some good things, there are too many convenient coincidences and too much pretentious analysis for the big questions raised."
Specializing in giving real people and events a light fictional touch-up, veteran British writer Massie (Let the Emperor Speak, 1987, etc.) now examines the destructive legacy of an Eichmann-like character and a Holocaust survivor, whose children meet, marry, and part. Read full book review >