Books by Allen Steele

Allen Mulherin Steele, Jr. became a full-time science fiction writer in 1988, following publication of his first short story, "Live From The Mars Hotel" (Asimov's, mid-Dec. `88). Since then he has become a prolific author of novels, short stories, and ess


AVENGERS OF THE MOON by Allen Steele
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 2017

"Had Steele spent as much effort deepening the characters as he does explaining a plasma gun, Captain Future might have a future; as is, this effort flounders in the past."
Captain Future and friends struggle to save the solar system from a separatist plot in a rebooted 1940s pulp science-fiction franchise. Read full book review >
ARKWRIGHT by Allen Steele
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A predictable tale that boldly goes where no one should have gone."
In Hugo Award-winning author Steele's (V-S Day, 2014, etc.) latest novel, a popular science-fiction writer aims to colonize space.Read full book review >
APOLLO'S OUTCASTS by Allen Steele
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 6, 2012

"Awkward prose notwithstanding, this is for anyone who's gazed longingly upward. (Science fiction. 11-16)"
Despite prose weaknesses, this space adventure with spectacular settings demonstrates that sometimes you can't keep a good plot down. Read full book review >
HEX by Allen Steele
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 7, 2011

"Dull and annoying."
Addition to Steele's interstellar colonization saga (Coyote Destiny, 2010, etc.) wherein Earth is kaput, and human civilization thrives on the remote planet Coyote. Read full book review >
GALAXY BLUES by Allen Steele
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 2008

"Fluffy, predictable, almost annoyingly pleasant—but Steele, twice a Hugo Award winner, has a large following."
Steele continues his space-colony Coyote series (Spindrift, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >
THE TRANQUILLITY ALTERNATIVE by Allen Steele
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1996

Extending his sequence of Robert Ludlumlike titles, Steele's latest jaunt (The Jericho Iteration, 1994) is set in an alternate world where America's space program, despite the establishment of a Moon base, a visit to Mars, and other successes, has run out of credibility and money and is being sold off to a German concern. One problem remains: A US silo on the Moon contains nuclear missiles that must be deactivated before the Germans take over. So the US Space Agency organizes one last mission, comprising pilot Gene Parnell, co-pilot Cris Ryer (a lesbian and thus despised by most of her colleagues), flight engineer Jay Lewitt—plus one British and two German astronauts, a couple of video journalists, and computer whiz Paul Dooley. As the ship nears the Moon, Parnell discovers that ``Paul Dooley'' has been replaced by a double, and that a treacherous plot is unfolding. The prime suspect is, of course, Ryer—but, disastrously, Dooley's partner turns out to be Lewitt. In the ensuing shoot-out, the journalists are killed by the Germans (the latter are both plotters) while the Brit gets blown away helping Parnell and the loyal Ryer. Behind all the shenanigans is a North Korean attempt to steal the missiles—which the CIA, in its usual efficient fashion, has known all about for months. Impressive in the hardware department, though with disappointingly stereotyped characters—and yet the generous padding, with reportage both real and imaginary, can't disguise the paucity of plot . . . or that Steele's real purpose is more propaganda than entertainment. Read full book review >
THE JERICHO ITERATION by Allen Steele
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

Steele picks the unlikely setting of an earthquake-devastated St. Louis, circa 2012, for his hardcover debut. As the city's residents struggle to rebuild their lives, operatives from the Emergency Relief Agency (ERA) conduct nocturnal raids against the homeless and swagger like Nazis. Gerry Rosen, the sophomoric narrator and a journalist for the Big Muddy Inquirer, has his suspicions of these ersatz storm troopers validated when a friend and coworker is murdered. The Tiptree Corporation, a local hi-tech outfit, seems implicated. While Rosen wallows in gratuitous self- pity and guilt over the death of his son and his impending divorce, his investigation reveals an unlikely conspiracy between Tiptree and the ERA to overthrow the federal government using a new laser satellite. Rescue comes in the amoeba-like form of Ruby Fulcrum, a Tiptree-designed computer virus/artificial intelligence that escapes into the national computer network and speaks to Rosen with his son's voice via pocket PC. Once the pair join forces, Fulcrum literally turns the laser against the ERA, democracy is protected, and Rosen has the biggest scoop of his career. But Rosen seems emotionally untouched by the experience: He does not come to terms with the loss of his son or wife. Not much to satisfy the reader here, just a puppy-dog characterization of artificial intelligence, detective novel repartee, and hopscotch leaps of plot. Read full book review >