Books by Andrea Gabriel

HE'S YOUR DADDY by Charline Profiri
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2018

"A clever, multispecies celebration of the father-child bond. (Informational picture book. 3-8)"
From pups and dogs to tadpoles and frogs, this book introduces young children to the names of daddy animals and those of their babies. Read full book review >
DAYTIME NIGHTTIME, ALL THROUGH THE YEAR by Diane Lang
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2017

"A presentation of animal activities for primary grade readers and listeners that is brought low by sadly pedestrian verse. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
Day and night and throughout the year, animals are busy and active. Read full book review >
LITTLE GRAY'S GREAT MIGRATION by Marta Lindsey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2014

"A suitable glimpse at a mammal that's likely to be overlooked in migration lessons. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Little Gray, a whale calf, doesn't want to leave his lagoon, but he soon realizes why he must make the long journey north. Read full book review >
WHY DO I SING? by Jennifer Blomgren
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"While this is a lovely visual tribute to Pacific Northwest animals, the stilted verse makes it a disappointing follow-up to the team's award-winning Where Do I Sleep? A Pacific Northwest Lullaby (2008). (Picture book/poetry. 2-7)"
A wolf's howl. A loon's haunting cry. What do they communicate? Read full book review >
EAGLET’S WORLD by Evelyn Minshull
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2001

Minshull (The Cornhusk Doll, 1987) follows an eaglet from preconscious life inside his egg through his first successful flight past snow-capped mountains as a young adult. She shows the gradual expansion of his world, from the confines of the egg to life as a baby in the cozy nest to his first scary flight when his mother nudges him out into the world. Those who object to anthropomorphized animal stories will want to let this one fly on by, as Eaglet has all the emotions and rational capabilities of a young child. But for those who don't mind the format and the determined cheery tone, Eaglet is an appealing, brave little character whose story has obvious parallels for children facing their first forays out of their own familial nests. Gabriel (Where Do I Sleep?, not reviewed) provides striking paintings of Eaglet's growth in double-page spreads that are designed for reading to a group. An author's note offers additional background on eagles that will be useful for classroom discussions. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >