Books by Anita Jeram

ONE MORE TICKLE! by Sam McBratney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"This will give readers a case of the giggles, but they won't be rolling on the floor in hysterics. (Board book. 1-3)"
The lovable hares return for a ticklefest. Read full book review >
LOOK WHAT I CAN DO by Sam McBratney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"While this father-and-son relationship is lovely and their habitat delightful, in this case, neither is well-suited to teaching about a more conceptual world. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
Little Nutbrown Hare explores colors, actions, shapes, numbers, sounds and the natural world on seven double-page spreads as his doting father looks on. Read full book review >
GUESS HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU: COLORS by Sam McBratney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 22, 2013

"While this is the first title in the series aimed directly at babies and young toddlers, the small size of the art and the washed-out color values make it an imperfect concept book. (Board book. 6 mos.-2)"
An exploration of color from McBratney and Jeram's nutbrown hares of Guess How Much I Love You fame. Read full book review >
LITTLE CHICK by Amy Hest
by Amy Hest, illustrated by Anita Jeram
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2009

Does the world need another charming picture book about an adorable baby chick? Maybe not, but that won't keep young listeners from loving this sunny set of three brief vignettes. Veteran writer Hest packs plenty of emotion and humor into the deceptively simple text as she brings to life Little Chick's enthusiasm and impatience as well as her wise Old-Auntie's love and counsel. The author manages the delicate task of tempering Little Chick's outsized expectations without crushing her spirit, a feat that may be more valued (or at least noticed) by adults than kids. Adult readers will likely also appreciate that whether she's wishing her carrot would grow bigger faster, working hard to raise her leaf-kite into the sky or stretching to pluck a star from the sky, Little Chick remains genuinely childlike without being cloyingly sweet or precociously clever. Jeram's loose, sketchy illustrations, created in pencil and watercolor, keep the two main characters front and center while providing just enough detail of the pleasant, pastoral setting. Warmly familiar and enchantingly fresh. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
WHEN I’M BIG by Sam McBratney
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

Here are two perfectly charming board books—When I'm Big and Colors Everywhere (978-0-7636-3545-9)—from the author and illustrator of Guess How Much I Love You, a bestseller that inspired a host of wannabes. These will no doubt fly off the shelves like their predecessor. In When I'm Big, Little Nutbrown Hare and Big Nutbrown Hare are out on a spring day. A sprouting acorn will grow into "a mighty tree," says Big Nutbrown Hare. Little sees a tadpole and is assured it will grow into a frog, and a caterpillar into a butterfly, and an egg into, well, not a big bird, but a grown-up one. In Colors Everywhere, on a summer's day, Little and Big note all the many blues, greens, reds and yellows in the world, and they choose their favorites among them, culminating in their favorite brown, which is, of course, nutbrown. The sweet, sunny watercolor-and-ink images are both simple and pretty, as is the warm relationship between Big and Little. (Picture books. 3-6) Read full book review >
COLORS EVERYWHERE by Sam McBratney
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

Here are two perfectly charming board books—When I'm Big and Colors Everywhere (978-0-7636-3545-9)—from the author and illustrator of Guess How Much I Love You, a bestseller that inspired a host of wannabes. These will no doubt fly off the shelves like their predecessor. In When I'm Big, Little Nutbrown Hare and Big Nutbrown Hare are out on a spring day. A sprouting acorn will grow into "a mighty tree," says Big Nutbrown Hare. Little sees a tadpole and is assured it will grow into a frog, and a caterpillar into a butterfly, and an egg into, well, not a big bird, but a grown-up one. In Colors Everywhere, on a summer's day, Little and Big note all the many blues, greens, reds and yellows in the world, and they choose their favorites among them, culminating in their favorite brown, which is, of course, nutbrown. The sweet, sunny watercolor-and-ink images are both simple and pretty, as is the warm relationship between Big and Little. (Picture books. 3-6) Read full book review >
YOU’RE ALL MY FAVORITES by Sam McBratney
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

More cozy family bonding from the creators of Guess How Much I Love You (1995). When three cubs want to know which is their parents' favorite, Mama and Papa Bear provide inclusive but satisfying answers. The bears, sporting a subtext-engendering array of hues and markings, pose closely together in various ursine or human postures amid minimal natural settings; Mama and Papa are plainly inseparable, and the young ones, though aware of their physical differences, hold paws on the cover and are, throughout, poster "children" for sibling harmony. McBratney and Jeram again combine to address a common childhood anxiety in a relaxed, irresistibly soothing way, and the competitiveness that mars their bestselling earlier title is much reduced here. (Picture book. 3-5)Read full book review >
YOU CAN DO IT, SAM by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

A warm gesture of generosity has Sam and Mrs. Bear up before dawn, baking, wrapping, and delivering small cakes in red gift bags to the sleeping neighbors' doors on their snowy street. Sam's exuberant impatience in the kitchen—"Come on, cakes . . . I can't wait . . . "—is tempered by his shy demeanor when encouraged to walk alone from mom's truck to each house with his savory treat: "Go, go, go! . . . You can do it, Sam." The satisfaction of gift-giving inspires confidence in this preschooler and a sense of security that's ultimately rewarded at home with his own tasty snack of cake and cocoa. Bright, colorful acrylics paint a dual scene of a toasty home life against a frosty clear morning. Endearing characters add to the sweetness and fulfillment that younger children will identify with, making this third Sam and Mrs. Bear story quite a delicious morsel. (Picture book. 2-4)Read full book review >
DON’T YOU FEEL WELL, SAM? by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

The direful sound of a toddler's cough in the night is the focus of this poignant sequel to Hest's Kiss Good Night (2001). All snuggled up in bed on a frosty night, the young bear cub Sam is kept awake by a persistent cough. Mrs. Bear's appearance with Sam's syrup heralds the battle of the medicine spoon. In typical toddler fashion, Sam staunchly declares that the syrup tastes too bad, the spoon is too large and too full. Hest adroitly captures the very essence of toddler feistiness when it comes to all things medicinal. "Sam opened up, then closed his mouth tight. Too much syrup on a too-big spoon." The irresistible allure of a snowy spectacle is ultimately the encouragement Sam needs to gulp down his syrup. Afterward, cozily ensconced in an armchair, mother and cub keep their vigil throughout the night until the first snowflakes appear—only to fall unseen by the pair gently dozing in the chair. Jeram's inviting acrylic illustrations draw readers into the snug warmth of the Bear home. Dusky hues combined with rich earth tones capture the soothing sense of twilight. Serene images convey the deep affection between parent and child while expressing the consummate feeling of security exuded by a well-cherished tot. Just the thing to share with a little one struggling with a bout of the sniffles. (Picture book. 2-6)Read full book review >
KISS GOOD NIGHT by Amy Hest
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"It was a dark and stormy night on Plum Street." From this Bulwer-Lytton opening spins a comforting bedtime tale—owing not a little to another, more famous bedtime tale—of Sam the bear's nighttime routine. In a well-rehearsed pattern, Mrs. Bear (dressed in a green cardigan) reads to Sam, tucks him in with his stuffed toys (one of which is very similar to a certain little rabbit from that famous bedtime tale), and gives him some milk, asking with each step if she has forgotten anything. Of course: kisses. Once delivered, Sam settles down at last "on a dark and stormy night on Plum Street." Hest's (The Friday Nights of Nana, p. 939, etc.) language is reminiscent of Margaret Wise Brown's in its enumeration of the minutiae of a small child's bedtime rituals: "Mrs. Bear sat on the bed beside Sam and they read his favorite book and they both knew all the words." The storm makes its presence felt within the text—"Outside the rain came down. Splat! on the roof"—but the coziness of the story protects Sam and the reader from the elements. Jeram's (All Together Now, 1999, etc.) bright, acrylic, full-bleed illustrations focus on Sam's bedroom, with its warm, yellow walls and big, green bed, the storm mostly relegated to glimpses through the window. A cute, even sweet, bedtime story, with text and illustrations that work well together, but really, do we need another Goodnight Moon? (Picture book. 2-5)Read full book review >
I LOVE MY LITTLE STORYBOOK by Anita Jeram
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

Sure to warm the auricles of newly independent readers (and older reading advocates) everywhere, this rhapsody features a brown-and-white bunny only a little bigger than its beloved storybook. Not only is it satisfying as an object ("It shades me on a sunny day. I love to make its pages flick . . . "), but as a gateway to "a magic forest" filled with "special friends," from a giant and a sleeping princess to rabbit-eared fairies and other magical creatures. Well-populated with toadstools and unicorns, ferns and flying mice, the forest really does have a magical look in Jeram's (Kiss Good Night, 2001, etc.) pale, idyllic watercolors. Though parents will be eager to share this with their own little bunnies, it's really a celebration of the joys of going one-on-one with a volume, of choosing where and how to read it, and when to stop. Understandably, though, "I love it from the beginning / all the way / right through to . . . the end." (Picture book. 4-6)Read full book review >
ALL TOGETHER NOW by Anita Jeram
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

Jeram brings back characters from Bunny, My Honey (1999) for this poignant tale about families. Although they are different species, the three friends—Bunny, Little Duckling, and Miss Mouse—form a unique family along with Mommy Rabbit. Instead of trying to make her "little Honeys" conform to some one ideal, the wise mother rabbit embraces their differences, incorporating their individuality into a special song created for the trio. Soft pastel illustrations capture both the playfulness of the threesome, and the loving bonds of the family. Through the song and the games the Honeys play, Jeram encourages readers to rejoice in diversity—a warm and timely message in a world full of complex and extended families. (Picture book. 3-6) Read full book review >
BUNNY, MY HONEY by Anita Jeram
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

A tender tale of loss and reunion, and the saving grace of a mother's love, from Jeram (Daisy Dare, 1995, etc.). Bunny and his favorite companions, Little Duckling and Miss Mouse, play and romp under the indulgent gaze of Mommy Rabbit. When Bunny wanders off into the woods and discovers he is lost he begins to cry for his mother. "Oh, how could such a bad thing happen? Perhaps it was a game that went wrong. Perhaps Bunny ran too far on his own." Before readers can become too alarmed, Mommy Rabbit is joyfully reunited with Bunny and he is safe in her warm embrace. Jeram addresses a common concern of toddlers in a comforting manner, while her whimsical drawings of Bunny and his friends are irresistible. A lighthearted yet compassionate tale. (Picture book. 2-5) Read full book review >
PUPPY LOVE by Dick King-Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

The pair that collaborated on I Love Guinea Pigs (1995) teams up again on a universally appealing subject, rendered quite personal by King-Smith. "I especially love puppies," he states, and it shows: All kinds of puppies in all manner of poses and settings accompany his descriptions of his experiences with them: Humphrey, a Great Dane; a slew of dachshunds lolling in the house of a dog breeder; a German shepherd named Fly. In the explanations of behavior and care, King-Smith provides homey details that Jeram puts to good use, creating a cozy backyard scene that expresses a puppy's lack of balance beautifully, or many small scenes on a spread, e.g., a bulletin board with snapshots of puppies. Jeram excels in showing her subjects from a puppy's-eye view, and in capturing their awkwardly lovable postures. This tender guide is educational, humorous, and irresistible—like puppies. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

In 31 anecdotes about animals he has known, King-Smith (The Stray, p. 1237, etc.) once again proves his worth as a born storyteller. The book opens with an introduction that includes photos of King-Smith, as a child and now; the stories themselves are accompanied by absolutely charming pictures by Jeram, no newcomer to King-Smith's world (I Love Guinea Pigs, 1995). They have the appeal of cartoons while being true-to-life, whether the subject is a guinea pig, golden pheasant, chameleon, or giant tortoise. Some of the pieces in this collection are very brief—no more than a paragraph—while others run a few pages in length. Whether the stories are poignant or funny, each leaves readers satisfied—and ready for more. The volume is long enough for readers who have left picture books behind, but still manageable for younger readers who are feeling adventurous. It's classified as animal anecdotes, but don't bury it in the 590s with assignment material. (Nonfiction. 5- 10)Read full book review >
DAISY DARE by Anita Jeram
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

Sprightly illustrations can't compensate for the irresponsible message in this tale of a fearless mouse who will accept any dare her friends think upwalking on top of a wall, eating a worm, making faces at an elderly neighbor. She sensibly refuses to take the bell off the sleeping cat at first, but then rises to their taunts. They all escape the aroused cat by the narrowest of margins, and instead of learning the dangers of recklessness, the friends praise Daisy's bravery and she preens with satisfaction. This outcome is depressingly typical of adolescent rituals of risk- taking, but hardly bears celebrating in a book for preschoolers. If Jeram (Dick King-Smith's I Love Guinea Pigs, p. 386) is aiming at a message about overcoming and admitting fear, what she conveys is that it's admirable to take foolish, even lethal risks when pride is at stake. Dare children, instead, to take on Kevin Henkes's Sheila Rae, the Brave (1987). (Picture book. 3-6) Read full book review >
I LOVE GUINEA PIGS by Dick King-Smith
Released: March 1, 1995

Another sure-to-be-popular addition to the "Read and Wonder" series of nonfiction picture books, for which this author and illustrator created All Pigs Are Beautiful (1993). King-Smith has a genius for making even simple texts a pleasure to read; his fondness for guinea pigs gives the straight facts in this book an air of excitement. The history of their name, their place in the animal kingdom, their life cycle, their varieties, and basic care facts (they are easy to keep) are all presented, along with portraits of some of King-Smith's favorite pets. He is honest about their relatively short life span (five to eight years) but softens this by saying that he likes to look at the apple tree under which his favorite two guinea pigs are buried and think about how much he enjoyed the time they had together. Jeram's watercolor and line illustrations match the tone of the text. The pictures are clearly composed, full of pudgy pets; plenty of white space balances the text and illustrations, making this a good selection for readers who are ready to go beyond easy books, but still need an inviting format. Some facts come in the form of hand-lettered captions under spot illustrations that smoothly enhance the running text. The depiction of older children in the book will ensure that middle grade readers looking for tips on care will also find this appealing. Useful for any collection or on any shelf near fellow guinea-pig lovers. (Picture book. 4+)Read full book review >
ALL PIGS ARE BEAUTIFUL by Dick King-Smith
Released: April 1, 1993

Allowing that his favorite was fierce-looking Monty, a 600- pound "large white" who had ten "wives" and was a "pushover" who loved to have his head scratched, the author of Babe, the Gallant Pig (1985) ruminates companionably about the habits and characters of pigs. Onetime farmer King-Smith treats his subject with perspicacity; this may be a paean to pigs, embellished with amusing "things a pig might be saying" ("Don't you dare pick up one of my babies"), but it's not sentimental; he even observes that a sow may accidentally squash her own young. And there's a sly subtext: pigs are wonderfully varied in size, shape, and color, and also, in many ways the author details, a lot like people—"But all pigs are beautiful." Jeram picks up King-Smith's affection and enthusiasm with humorously limned porcines in vigorous pen lines dappled with soft watercolors. Entertaining and genuinely informative: the best yet in the uneven new "Read and Wonder" series. (Picture book. 4+)Read full book review >
IT WAS JAKE! by Anita Jeram
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

In an amusing alternative to the imaginary-friend scapegoat, Danny blames his misdemeanors on his huge, obliging dog until his mother calls a halt: ``Jake can't use scissors...and Jake can't dress himself!'' Danny, not Jake, is sent to bed supperless. His mother relents, but Jake inadvertently exacts fitting revenge: Danny's sandwich disappears, and this time Jake really is the culprit. Appropriately light-hearted illustrations round out the funny side of this slight but pleasing story. (Picture book. 4-8) Read full book review >