Books by Anna Salter

Anna Salter is a forensic psychologist with a specialty in assessing and treating sex offenders. She has been a faculty member of the Dartmouth Medical School as well as trained mental health professionals all over the world. She is also the author of fou


TRUTH CATCHER by Anna Salter
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 20, 2007

"Salter (Prison Blues, 2002, etc.) writes compellingly about the criminal mind. Though the story is overstuffed, the appealing heroine is worth return engagements."
A forensic psychologist's attempt to prevent the imminent release of a dangerous prisoner is complicated by a distress call from an old friend. Read full book review >
FAULT LINES by Anna Salter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 1998

Second thriller featuring female Vermont forensic psychologist Dr. Michael Stone (Shiny Water, 1997). Dr. Stone, a specialist in child abuse and domestic violence, helped put away Alex B. Willy, a child molester who—during an earlier interview not admissible as evidence—revealed to Stone a whole batch of crimes he wasn't charged with. Though sentenced to 30 years, Willy has now been released on the technicality that the child witnesses in his trial had been overly suggestible. Clearly, Willy can—t let Stone survive knowing what she knows about him, and, indeed, amused messages from him start popping up on her E-mail—messages that point to Willy having bugged her office and having taped her interviews with clients. Willy zeroes in on what he sees as Stone's psychic fault lines, which include the death of her daughter Jordan by SIDS while at day-care. Stone, meanwhile, hires a retired FBI agent to sweep her office for bugs. He finds nothing, but Willy keeps right on sending incredibly up-to-the-moment messages. What to do? Instead of being a sitting duck, Stone wonders whether she should go after Willy herself. At the same time, she's beleaguered by Camille, a deeply unstable rape-and-torture victim who now protects herself with Keeter, a dangerous Rottweiler attack dog. When Camille learns of the threat against Stone, she begins to shadow Stone secretly, with the intention of protecting her, an idea that rapidly proves more hindrance than help. The outcome, a face-off with a psychopathic pedophile, is as predictable as a heroine tied to railroad tracks. Still, there are shocks here, and each plot twist turns on a kink in an insanely brilliant mind. Not Thomas Harris and The Silence of the Lambs by a long shot, but a book steadily gripping in its psychology, despite an overly familiar villain. Read full book review >
SHINY WATER by Anna Salter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

Forensic psychologist Michael Stone is a supposedly neutral expert in child abuse who's just testifying in Sharon Southworth's custody suit against her husband. And it's a good thing she's not Sharon's hired gun, because Sharon is the client from hell—a paranoid hysteric who wouldn't stand a chance of getting her children away from their father, a successful thoracic surgeon, if both Adrienne and Andrew weren't clearly alleging that daddy had been playing doctor with them. Even that revelation, in fact, isn't enough to turn the tide: Dr. Nathan Southworth ends up getting custody of both kids just in time for them to get murdered, smothered, and laid out neatly on the beds Sharon's kept for them at her place. The cops tag Sharon for the killings when they find a highly pertinent leaf torn from Michael's copy of Toni Morrison's Beloved mounted in Sharon's diary, and Michael's reputation as an expert witness seems doomed—unless she teases another molester, a Hannibal Lecter wannabe named Alex B. Willy, into venturing out of his cell into a visiting room to give her creepy hints about what the few clues in the case really mean. Michael, a southerner transplanted to Vermont whose fetish is to own no more than 250 objects at once, is fascinating when she talks about the pitfalls of examining children. As the main detective in this thinly imagined debut, though, she poses no threat to Kay Scarpetta or Clarice Starling. Read full book review >