Books by Anne Harris

INVENTING MEMORY by Anne Harris
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2004

"Earnestly inventing something, but it's not clear what."
Double-stranded feminist yarn from the author of Accidental Creatures (1998), etc. Read full book review >
ACCIDENTAL CREATURES by Anne Harris
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

With the collapse of the motor industry, the car plants of Detroit became GeneSys's Vattown; here, vatdivers harvest valuable biopolymers from huge vats but are forced to work in diving suits that protect them from the vats' lethal growth medium. Even a short exposure to the growth medium results in genetic damage, whereas a longer exposure means a horrid, lingering, cancerous death. So, among the oppressed vatdiver community, sports—mutants—are common, but GeneSys will not allow the sports to work. As a result, sports like Chango Chichelski must eke out a living by petty thievery and doing odd jobs; Chango herself hopes to prove that the death of her vatdiver sister, Ada, the leader of a strike, was a company plot. She meets young Helix (Helix has fangs and four functional arms), who has run away from her guardian, Hector Martin, GeneSys's genius scientist (he's battling with the ruthlessly ambitious manager Nathan Graham over the future of the Tetra Project). Oddly, Helix likes the smell of the vats and seems to thrive on the growth medium that's lethal to everyone else. It turns out that Helix is one of a new species created by Hector to work in the vats. But to survive Helix has to not only win over the angry, hostile vatdivers, whose jobs are threatened, but also help expose the murderous Graham and GeneSys itself. A well-worked-out, confidently handled drama, but lacking the freshness and flair that made Harris's debut (The Nature of Smoke, 1996) such an eye-opener. Read full book review >
THE NATURE OF SMOKE by Anne Harris
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1996

Sometime in the next century, Magnolia flees from a hopeless existence in the slums of Detroit. In New York, she's picked up by the weaselly Dano and almost becomes the victim of a snuff broadcast; but, turning the tables on Dano, she stabs him and escapes. The broadcast is observed by megalomaniac scientist Dr. Remus Rahul, who steers Magnolia into his organization, hoping to use her as a template for a line of superior android ``robots.'' Instead, unknown to Rahul, she ends up in his secret complex in Siberia, where she discovers Tumcari, a half-human aquatic creature created by Rahul and researcher Cid (she becomes Magnolia's lover). Cid learns that Tumcari's cellular mitochondria somehow communicate with one another, even when separated from his body, giving him remarkable new abilities. Eventually, Rahul discovers both Magnolia's whereabouts and Cid's experiments, and the two flee to Amsterdam. Here, all the characters converge in a sort of chaotic strange attraction; many become infected with the virus that Cid has developed to spread the communicating mitochondria that offer an ecstatic gestalt communion. An exciting and encouraging debut—flawed, furious, fizzing with ideas, and with a plot that bangs and crashes like boxcars in a switching yard. Read full book review >