Books by Anthony Horowitz

Anthony Horowitz's life might have been copied from the pages of Charles Dickens or the Brothers Grimm. Born in 1956 in Stanmore, Middlesex, to a family of wealth and status, Anthony was raised by nannies, surrounded by servants and chauffeurs. His fath


THE SENTENCE IS DEATH by Anthony Horowitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 2019

"Perhaps too much ingenuity for its own good. But except for Jeffery Deaver and Sophie Hannah, no one currently working the field has anywhere near this much ingenuity to burn."
Fired Scotland Yard detective Daniel Hawthorne bursts onto the scene of his unwilling collaborator and amanuensis, screenwriter/novelist Anthony, who seems to share all Horowitz's (Forever and a Day, 2018, etc.) credentials, to tell him that the game's afoot again. Read full book review >
FOREVER AND A DAY by Anthony Horowitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 6, 2018

"Crisp, unpretentious, and bound to please the legion of fans for whom a world of Bond is never enough."
Horowitz celebrates his return to the James Bond franchise (Trigger Mortis, 2015) by providing the story of 007's very first adventure in 1950. Read full book review >
THE WORD IS MURDER by Anthony Horowitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2018

"Though the impatient, tightfisted, homophobic lead detective is impossible to love, the mind-boggling plot triumphs over its characters: Sharp-witted readers who think they've solved the puzzle early on can rest assured that they've opened only one of many dazzling Christmas packages Horowitz has left beautifully wrapped under the tree."
Television writer/Christie-loving Sherlock-ian Horowitz (Magpie Murders, 2017, etc.) spins a fiendishly clever puzzle about a television writer/Christie-loving Sherlock-ian named Anthony Something who partners with a modern Sherlock Holmes to solve a baffling case. Read full book review >
NEVER SAY DIE by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"It's as if there'd been no interruption; this installment is sure to please Alex's legions of fans. (Thriller. 10-14)"
After ending his Alex Rider series with flashback volume Russian Roulette (2013), Horowitz revives his bestselling adventure series, sending his hero on a pursuit that is very, very personal. Read full book review >
SCORPIA by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Perhaps Rider's most thrilling adventure to date, this spinoff delivers a hearty dose of intrigue, dark secrets, and breakneck action. (Graphic adaptation. 8-13)"
In this graphic-novel adaptation of the popular series, teenage spy Alex Rider must infiltrate a ruthless gang of assassins in possession of a terrifying deadly weapon. Read full book review >
MAGPIE MURDERS by Anthony Horowitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 2017

"Fans who still mourn the passing of Agatha Christie, the model who's evoked here in dozens of telltale details, will welcome this wildly inventive homage/update/commentary as the most fiendishly clever puzzle—make that two puzzles—of the year."
A preternaturally brainy novel within a novel that's both a pastiche and a deconstruction of golden-age whodunits. Read full book review >
MORIARTY by Anthony Horowitz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Readers who aren't put off by the Hollywood pacing, with action set pieces less like Conan Doyle than the Robert Downey Jr. movies, are in for a rare treat, a mystery as original as it is enthralling."
A Sherlockian pastiche without Holmes and Watson? Yes indeed, and it's a tour de force quite unlike any other fruit from these densely plowed fields. Read full book review >
BLOODY HOROWITZ by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

The creator of Alex Rider follows his two Horowitz Horror anthologies with a new collection of 14 bloody stories. A would-be writer seeking revenge for stolen ideas stalks and apparently kills author Darren Shan (is this wish fulfillment?). In the far future, a robot nanny malfunctions with horrifying consequences. A girl finds herself put up for auction when her family's finances tank and is terrified when she discovers what the bidders plan to do with her should they win. The standouts of this uneven collection include the false introduction and conclusion supposedly written by others and a bad dream recounted in verse. Good kids find themselves trapped in bizarre situations and bad kids get just what they deserve and more every time. Inconsistent Americanization and lengthy setups mar these at-times predictable tales. An overreliance on grisly moments and contrived twists for what scares there are guarantees there's nothing to keep the lights on late, just occasional ick. Fans of the previous collections will be right at home. (Horror/short stories. 9-13)Read full book review >
LEGENDS: BATTLES AND QUESTS by Anthony Horowitz
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 2010

Mining his backlist, Horowitz offers six traditional tales from the Kingfisher Book of Myths and Legends (U.K. edition 1985, no previous U.S. edition), revised and repackaged in the first of a projected half-dozen volumes. Going straight for the gusto, he opens with the story of Theseus and the Minotaur ("I want to be more than your friend," purrs Ariadne, arming the hero for his battle with the horned monster), then follows with the suicide dive required to cast "The Great Bell of Peking" [sic], the blood-soaked legend of Romulus and Remus, an Amazonian tale so violent that the author opens with an apology, an Incan story that ends with a child sacrifice and finally, in a break from the gore, the tale of Sir Gawain and "The Ugly Wife." Comics-style spot art, panels and insets featuring fearsome creatures and muscular heroes in (often scanty) period costume add further notes of melodrama to nearly every spread. The simultaneously published Legends: Beasts and Monsters (ISBN: 978-0-7534-1936-6) dishes up an even less palatable buffet. (Folktales. 10-13)Read full book review >
THE SWITCH by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

Spoiled 13-year-old Thomas Arnold David—Tad—is like a large, contented cat curled up in the lap of luxury—until his parents deny him something he wants. Carelessly, he wishes to be "somebody else," and poof, he wakes up in the body of carnival worker and sometime thief Bob Snarby. As Bob, Tad finds himself nabbed by the police and deposited at a home for troubled children that is, ironically, run by Tad's father. While there, Tad learns some awful truths about his father's business empire and vows never to return home even if he returns to his proper body. While the events that transpire in this winsome adventure are delightfully absurd, the transformation that Tad undergoes strikes a genuine note. It is the young person's journey to self-definition writ large. Dramatically and irrevocably separated from his family, Tad sees his parents from another perspective and in a broader context, which enables him to begin to establish a moral compass for himself that is much different from his father's. Sure to please, and to expand, Horowitz's tween fan base. (Fantasy. 10-14)Read full book review >
GROOSHAM GRANGE by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

Twelve-year-old David has exasperated his parents with his underachieving ways for the last time. As a lucky coincidence, they receive a letter inviting David to attend Groosham Grange just as he is expelled from another school. They're thrilled, especially since Groosham touts its reputation for straightening out malcontents like David. He and two others he meets on the train there are immediately suspicious of it, however. The school's pupils are eerily, vacantly adoring of the sinister old building and its creepy staff. The mystery deepens one night when David awakens to see them all trooping off into the library, where they vanish. Bursts of dark slapstick humor (such as David's dad accidentally stabbing his mom in the opening chapter) mix oddly with its light horror plot, and unsubtle foreshadowing stunts the suspense. Fans of Horowitz will form a natural readership for what looks to be the first in a new series, but whether they will find this as satisfying as his more carefully developed works is questionable. (Horror. 9-12)Read full book review >
NIGHTRISE by Anthony Horowitz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: July 1, 2007

In this third of the Gatekeepers series, Horowitz ups the ante considerably when he brings the third and fourth of "The Five" into the story. Identical twins Scott and Jamie, abandoned in a cave sacred to the Washoe Indians, have bounced from foster home to institution and are headed for much, much worse. A preemptive strike by the evil Nightrise Corporation makes Scott a captive and leaves Jamie, the less effective of the mind-reading twins, to make the rescue. Time travel, visits to a dream universe and mind control add a fascinating occult element to this thriller. Horowitz truly knows his way around a plot; he keeps the tension at a nail-biting level throughout and makes the apocalyptic situation clear without getting bogged down in description of the two previous books. Characters exist to drive this plot—with the twins and a couple of others well-developed and the rest edging into stereotype. The smashing climax is totally satisfying while anticipating the world-saving to come. Stock up—it should fly off the shelves! (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >
NIGHTRISE by Anthony Horowitz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: July 1, 2007

In this third of the Gatekeepers series, Horowitz ups the ante considerably when he brings the third and fourth of "The Five" into the story. Identical twins Scott and Jamie, abandoned in a cave sacred to the Washoe Indians, have bounced from foster home to institution and are headed for much, much worse. A preemptive strike by the evil Nightrise Corporation makes Scott a captive and leaves Jamie, the less effective of the mind-reading twins, to make the rescue. Time travel, visits to a dream universe and mind control add a fascinating occult element to this thriller. Horowitz truly knows his way around a plot; he keeps the tension at a nail-biting level throughout and makes the apocalyptic situation clear without getting bogged down in description of the two previous books. Characters exist to drive this plot—with the twins and a couple of others well-developed and the rest edging into stereotype. The smashing climax is totally satisfying while anticipating the world-saving to come. Stock up—it should fly off the shelves! (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >
FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2006

Matt Freeman, hero of Raven's Gate (2005), returns for another supercharged adventure tale from a master of the trade. In this sequel, Matt leaves England, meets Pedro, the second of the gatekeepers, and attempts to prevent an evil ancient god from reaching earth through a gate in the Peruvian desert. Sustained suspense beginning in the prologue and doesn't let up, providing for a compulsive read. Danger abounds for the two boys. Dead bodies line the paths they travel. Plenty of gore—gently described—place this in the Indiana Jones genre of adventure tale. Lots of cool details sustain interest; among them are the boys' mystical mental powers, golden treasure hidden in the walls of Cusco and a visit to the lost city of the Incas. As in some plot-driven stories, stereotypes provide an easy shortcut. Horowitz, however, does reverse some roles—in this case, the Incans are the good guys. The climax, littered with dead heroes and villains alike, guarantees a suspenseful start for the next installment. Bring on gatekeeper number three—soon. (Fiction. YA) Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2005

This first in a projected series by the author of the Alex Rider books has it all—mystery, suspense, conspiracies, occult elements and science gone amuck—and instead of becoming a novelistic mish-mash, it all works. Rejected by his only living relative, betrayed to the police by a supposed friend, Matt Freeman chooses to serve a probationary sentence on an English farm near York rather than in a juvenile detention center. Shortly after he arrives at Hive Hill—the farm owned by his sinister guardian—a thoroughly terrified Matt discovers that he can't escape either the farm or the mysterious destiny facing him. In this page-turner, Horowitz constantly jacks up the tension, ricocheting from catastrophe to disaster and violently killing off any adults who try to help Matt. Many of the 20 chapters end in cliffhangers, while the spectacular climax and surprising conclusion provide both a satisfying ending and a good set-up for the next in the series. Go. Visit. Have an exhilarating read. (Fiction. 10-14)Read full book review >
EAGLE STRIKE by Anthony Horowitz
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2004

Here's more zippy action and fast-moving drama starring Alex Rider, in the fourth installment of the teenage spy series. This time, 14-year-old Alex saves the world all on his own, without help from MI6, as he accidentally becomes involved with a paid assassin and an insane rock star who's plotting nuclear evil. This episode has Alex thrust into a life-sized computer game in which he himself is the action hero, dodging real spears, and battling snakes and Aztec gods, in a chapter that certainly will appeal to adolescent boys. The final confrontation features Alex trapped inside a hijacked Air Force One with the nuclear warheads already launched. Can Alex destroy them in time? It's all absurd fun that lives up to the excitement young readers have come to expect from Horowitz. (Fiction. 12+)Read full book review >
SKELETON KEY by Anthony Horowitz
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 1, 2003

The third in the continuing adventures of Alex Rider, 14-year-old British spy, provides a rollicking ride for young action fans. Alex finds himself entangled with a renegade Russian general intent on causing a massive nuclear explosion that would poison most of Western Europe. Armed with a few spy gadgets and his own sense of duty, Alex masquerades as the son CIA agents and travels to a small island owned by Cuba. He foils an attempt by a ruthless smuggler to kidnap and murder his ersatz father, fights a frenzied great white shark, and barely avoids being crushed to death as a conveyor belt moves him ever closer to the grinding wheels in an old sugar mill. Finally meeting his major foe, he learns that the man identifies Alex with his dead son and wants to adopt him. Alex must fight the villain as a nuclear bomb ticks off the seconds to doomsday. Horowitz continues his always preposterous plots with several unapologetic references to the James Bond oeuvre. As usual, he keeps the suspense high and the pages turning; it's pure escapist entertainment. (Fiction. 12-16)Read full book review >
STORMBREAKER by Anthony Horowitz
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2001

What if James Bond had started spying as a teenager? This thriller pits 14-year-old Alex Rider against a mad billionaire industrialist. Non-stop action keeps the intrigue boiling as Alex tries to stop the remarkably evil Herod Sayles from murdering Britain's schoolchildren through biological warfare. Alex begins as an innocent boy shocked by the death of his Uncle Ian in a traffic accident. Suspicious of the official explanation, he investigates and finds Ian's car riddled with bullet holes. He narrowly escapes being crushed in the car as it's demolished, then climbs out of a 15-story window to break into Ian's office. He learns that Ian was a spy, and reluctantly joins Britain's MI6 intelligence agency. After surviving brutal training and armed with stealthy spy tools, Alex infiltrates Sayles's operation as the teenage tester of the "Stormbreaker," a new computer Sayles is giving to British schools. Thereafter he survives murderous ATV drivers, an underwater swim in an abandoned mine, and an encounter with a Portuguese man-o-war jellyfish before hitching a ride on an already airborne plane. The plot is, of course, preposterous, but young readers won't care as they zoom through numerous cliffhangers. This is the first book in a series planned by the author, and may prove useful for reluctant readers looking for excitement. (Fiction. 12-14)Read full book review >
POINT BLANK by Anthony Horowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

Fasten your seat belts for the second installment in Anthony Horowitz's spy-thriller series starring 14-year-old British schoolboy and ace agent from MI6, Alex Rider. James Bond has nothing on this crafty kid, and it's lucky Alex is on the job. It seems that mad scientists still infest the planet and still want to rule the world. When readers first met Alex in Stormbreaker (2001), MI6 had sent him to spy school. This time they send him to an exclusive school for the recalcitrant sons of the super-rich. Disguised as the son of a British supermarket magnate, Alex learns that something extraordinarily odd is going on at the school. Yes indeed, the school's owner, the creepy South African apartheid supporter Dr. Grief, intends to take over the world by controlling his wealthy students. But who are his students? Is Dr. Grief using brainwashing, fear, or something more sinister on the boys? Can Alex escape from the fortress-like school before that sinister something happens to him? Horowitz devises a string of miraculous circumstances that keeps Alex alive and spying throughout. Spy thrillers appear too seldom in YA literature. With plenty of cliffhanger action, the Alex Rider adventures might help get young readers hooked. The unabashed fantasy imitates the James Bond movies more closely than the books, but it's all plenty of fun. (Fiction. 11-14)Read full book review >
THE DEVIL AND HIS BOY by Anthony Horowitz
Released: March 1, 2000

"This unique blend of fact-based characters and inspired storytelling will appeal especially to readers who enjoy an imaginative, no-holds-barred approach to historical fiction. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Short, action-packed chapters convincingly portray the sights, smells, and sounds of lower-class Elizabethan England in 1593. Read full book review >