Books by Antony John

THE OTHER, BETTER ME by Antony John
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2019

"Comfortably low-key, character-driven entertainment. (Fiction. 8-12)"
An amiable fifth grader's school assignment leads her to seek out the father she's never known. Read full book review >
MASCOT by Antony John
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 11, 2018

"This funny, if flawed, baseball-infused tale highlights the challenges of adapting to puberty and sudden disability at the same time. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Last April Noah was a Little League catcher on a strong team—five months and one devastating car accident later, the seventh-grader's fatherless, bitter, and sidelined in a wheelchair. Read full book review >
IMPOSTER by Antony John
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Aims for thrilling; reaches trite. (Thriller. 12-16)"
A teenage thespian battles ubiquitous paparazzi and parasitic producers. Read full book review >
RENEGADE by Antony John
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 13, 2014

"Fun but ultimately unremarkable. (Post-apocalyptic historical adventure. 12-16)"
The action-packed conclusion to the dystopic alt-history trilogy. Read full book review >
FIREBRAND by Antony John
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 14, 2013

"Perhaps all will be revealed in another sequel. (Post-apocalyptic adventure. 12-16)"
The second installment of the Elemental series sees Thomas and his friends leaving Hatteras Island for new dangers (Elemental, 2012). Read full book review >
ELEMENTAL by Antony John
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 21, 2012

"Readers may not catch all the loose historical connections, but they'll like the action in this occasionally exciting story of survival. (Post-apocalyptic adventure. 12-16)"
The lost colony of Roanoke Island meets Captain Kidd. Read full book review >
THOU SHALT NOT ROAD TRIP by Antony John
Released: April 12, 2012

"Readers who stick around for the back story will be rewarded; many, however, will lose faith. (Fiction. 12 & up) "
Luke Dorsey, the 16-year-old author of bestselling "spiritual chronicle" Hallelujah, goes on a calamitous road trip to promote his book. Read full book review >
FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB by Antony John
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

Piper—gutsy, savvy and, yes, deaf—has signed her way into a gig that promises a big, necessary payoff: manager of Dumb, Seattle's Battle of the Bands winners. Seething with resentment and feelings of inadequacy after her parents raid her college account to pay for her baby sister's cochlear implants, Piper is determined to shape both Dumb's future and her own. Piper's struggles and growth as a manager—she is initially hampered by lack of both experience with intra-band politics and knowledge about music—enjoy realistic treatment, as do her nuanced relationships with family members and the super-talented and adorable Ed Chen. As Piper learns about Seattle's rock heroes (Cobain and Hendrix), she sees both the band Dumb could be if they would choose rocking over fighting and the person she will become once she truly owns her deafness. Making Piper the manager of a rock band never feels like a cheap trick (pardon the pun) because Piper is not A Great Deaf Character but a great character who is deaf. Complex characterizations, authentic dialogue and realistic ups-and-downs give this title chart-topping potential. (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

Flute-playing band loser Kevin unexpectedly ups his mojo but loses respect when superjock Brandon Trent signs him on to compile The Book of Busts, a secret notebook that lists the body measurements of all the girls who go to the school. Soon, all the young women around him are either racing to date him or hate him, and Kevin finds he has to choose between doing the right thing—chucking the book, obviously—or maintaining his newfound popularity. Sexual innuendos run amuck in the first few pages of this well-meaning but tepid comedic battle of the sexes. John's caricatures of Brandon's friends are hilariously dead on, especially when the dialogue between them is nothing more than "Dude. Like. Whoa." It's these smaller elements and the supporting cast that keep the plot from getting too heavy, and readers won't latch onto the feminism-fueled plot so much as Kevin himself as he squirms between getting all the girls he dreams about and being honest with the one girl he actually wants. (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >