Books by Arthur M. Schlesinger

Released: Feb. 24, 1992

"A refreshing, outspoken treatment of a phenomenon too often clothed in euphemism."
A passionate criticism of multiculturalism by the two-time Pulitzer-winner. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 24, 1986

"Undeniably a worthy and important work, if one keeps a wary eye out for the political bias."
Schlesinger's first book since his National Book Award-winning Robert Kennedy and His Times, this one exploring the grand themes which he sees weaving their way through American History. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 5, 1978

"Sentimental, rhetorical, partisan—and indispensable."
In the elegiac spirit of A Thousand Days—and with access to the family papers—Schlesinger has mounted a massive attack on the Robert Kennedy conundrum (shy/aggressive, compassionate/ruthless) and, no less, on the Kennedy brothers' detractors. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 19, 1973

"But withal, Schlesinger has seemingly effortlessly traced the rise of the autocratic White House and that is sufficient."
Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. will be read because he is Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. Read full book review >
Released: April 24, 1972

"Just in time for this year's encounter with history."
Fifteen essays by historians like Link and Freidel culled from the comprehensive four-volume History of American Presidential Elections (1971) which analyze crucial American presidential elections between 1789 and 1964. Read full book review >
Released: May 12, 1969

"But it will strike the right note among the embattled ADA-ers for whom he speaks."
From one of our most prolific sons of Harvard, and Kennedy family intimates, these are magisterial essays which seek to reassess our institutions and values in a time of widespread anxiety about both. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 22, 1968

"It's an utter delight to read; no substitute for classics like the Beards, Dorfman or Jameson, much less new, rigorous scholarship—but a worthy complement."
The author, who finished this book just before his death in 1965, was a Harvard professor of considerable stature as well as the father of Arthur, Jr. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 19, 1967

"Incisive, clarifying, calm, Mr. Schlesinger deals with the situation from a position of informed authority in relation to the seats of power; of the many, this is the one book on Vietnam which appears to hold a usable key in this connection, to provide a move acceptable to the administration."
Why we are in Vietnam is today a question of mainly historical interest. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 29, 1965

"Both have written that seldom book — the one you have to read and will probably want at home."
This and Sorensen's Kennedy (p. 860) will continue to stand out long after the discussion of whether or not "instant history" is a valid, or even ethical, form. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1965

"The public should do no less."
The remainder of the title of this timely reissue, somewhat revised from 1951, is "And the Future of American Foreign Policy." Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 17, 1963

"Still, a revealing, rewarding good general guide."
A two-volume safari into the paths of America's intellectual evolution, one which cuts some whackingly good, and not-so-good, swaths from the Colonial wilderness to the New Frontier. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1963

"For the faculty clubs."
As a historian Professor Schlesinger has sired some significant scholarship; as a father he's also sired one of President Kennedy's hot-shot Special Assistants; nevertheless, his In Retrospect is about as invigorating as a Class Report. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 3, 1960

"The subject, the author, and the time offer cumulative possibilities for a political profile which is sure to attract attention."
For those (and among them presumably the great number of undecided voters) who view both presidential candidates as "packaged products", "processed politicians", "machine twins", the Harvard historian and distinguished biographer (and of course liberal democrat) has written this short monograph- differentiating between the men, their politices and their parties. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 7, 1960

"It is exciting material and particularly pertinent on the eve of the election to come."
This is the third volume in Schlesinger's study The Age of Roosevelt, and it continues the domestic history of the F.D.R. administration. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 1958

"But on its own merits it is essential reading for this and any period and season."
The Crisis of the Old Order, (1957) which launched this monumental assessment of a relatively contemporary era in American social, political and economic life, was an epitaph to a period which ran its opulent but progressively more ruinous course from 1919-1933. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1957

"Not a major Schlesinger book, from the point of the general public, but a signal contribution to a specific area of interest."
The title to this new book by one of our ablest historians is misleading, while the sub-title actually tells the story. Read full book review >
THE CHALLENGE by Arthur M. Schlesinger
Released: June 15, 1956

"Not to be missed by any person with a potential interest in the subject."
In Schlesinger's view, Roosevelt is the summation of an era in American, social, political and economic life. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 1956

"Not to be missed by any person with a potential interest in the subject."
In Schlesinger's view, Roosevelt is the summation of an era in American social, political and economic life. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 17, 1951

"A revealing and disturbing book."
The MacArthur fans will find this a bitter pill to swallow. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 5, 1950

"An essay which has both political and philosophical, historical and contemporary significance."
By one of the leading, interpretative historians of our time, this short study was made possible by the Haynes' Foundation and is an informed, stimulating consideration of the reform impulse in America, from its first upsurge in 1841 with Emerson to its abiding vitality derived from the Declaration of Independence. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 8, 1949

"A difficult but important book."
Pulitzer Prize winner (with his Age of Jackson) and probably the youngest important historian in the United States, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. here speaks for a generation that came too late to fall under the spell of the Communist dream, and that now views with alarm the decadence of Communism seizing hold of vast tracts of Europe and Asia. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 26, 1946

"A documentary which is rather limited in subject and interest, a book for reference on manners of the times, rather than an etiquette book per se."
A brief biography of behaviour, which analyses from old annals the evolution of department from revolutionary times to the present. Read full book review >
THE AGE OF JACKSON by Arthur M. Schlesinger
Released: Sept. 13, 1945

"A thoughtful and scholarly book, substantially documented, but not for popular reading."
The whole panorama of converting the Jeffersonian myth and the Jacksonian action into a formulated Democratic Party, its rise and decline, includes not only Andrew Jackson, but carries through the Civil War and the dislocation of party lines, so that the Republicanism of Lincoln incorporated the elements of the Jacksonian ideals, and party names had become largely tag lines. Read full book review >
Released: April 20, 1939

"It is objectively written, but contains many rather abstract disquisitions."
A man forgotten — who 50 years ago was constantly on the battlefields of religion, philosophy, social science, politics, his weapons a trenchant pen and a ready flow of oratory. Read full book review >