Books by Barbara O’Connor

THE FANTASTIC SECRET OF OWEN JESTER by Barbara O’Connor
ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 31, 2010

"O'Connor has spun a lovely read that perfectly captures the schemes and plans of school-age kids in the long days of summer. (Fiction. 8-11)"
"The short, sad life of Tooley Graham was over," doesn't sound like a happy conclusion but is pitch perfect in this short, simple and endearing middle-grade novel that follows on the heels of The Small Adeventure of Popeye and Elvis (2009). Read full book review >
THE SMALL ADVENTURE OF POPEYE AND ELVIS by Barbara O’Connor
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2009

"Fast-paced, short and easy to read, but spiced up with the challenging vocabulary words that Velma teaches and Popeye adores and abounding with quirky, likable characters, this small gem has the power to keep readers entranced. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Popeye's life lacks excitement, living as he does down a gravel road bordering the woods in rural South Carolina with his dog Boo and his Grandmother Velma, who preserves her sanity by incessantly reciting the kings and queens of England. Read full book review >
GREETINGS FROM NOWHERE by Barbara O’Connor
FICTION
Released: March 26, 2008

"O'Connor artfully weaves together the hopes, fears, disappointments, sorrows and joys of her multi-generational cast to produce a warm and satisfying conclusion. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The lives of four families change when they intersect at a run-down motel in the middle of nowhere. Read full book review >
HOW TO STEAL A DOG by Barbara O’Connor
ANIMALS
Released: April 6, 2007

"A powerful portrayal from an innocently youthful perspective. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Georgina and younger brother Toby begin a homeless life living in Mom's car, having been evicted when Dad leaves. Read full book review >
TAKING CARE OF MOSES by Barbara O’Connor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 13, 2004

"Good premise and delivery make this a thought-provoking choice for discussion. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Randall, 11, is harboring a secret. Read full book review >
FAME AND GLORY IN FREEDOM, GEORGIA by Barbara O’Connor
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Bird's original voice has charm, grit, and spunkiness that, combined with small town sensibilities, unique characters, and humor, spell out a winner. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When Bird decides to make a friend of Harlem Tate, the big new boy in sixth grade who looks mean and acts dumb, she gets whopped upside the head with a dose of reality. Read full book review >
MOONPIE AND IVY by Barbara O’Connor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 7, 2001

"But she has learned to hope, and that is no small thing for her—and the reader—to carry away. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The twin challenges of loving and being loved form the theme of another Southern gem from the author of Me and Rupert Goody (1999). Read full book review >
ME AND RUPERT GOODY by Barbara O’Connor
Released: Oct. 15, 1999

"Perhaps wisely, the author doesn't deal with the issues of Rupert's mixed race or out-of-wedlock birth; the townspeople accept it, Jennalee eventually accepts it, and readers are expected to accept it as well. (Fiction. 10-12)"
From O'Connor (Beethoven in Paradise, 1997), a second novel grounded by a clear sense of place, and by the well-defined characters who inhabit it. Read full book review >
BEETHOVEN IN PARADISE by Barbara O’Connor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 4, 1997

"Readers will relish this trip down South, and they couldn't ask for a better guide than O'Connor, who captures a young boy's heart and holds it out as a gift."
For every child who was ever forced to play sports, a kindred spirit: Martin, 12, the funny, angst-ridden, musically talented hero of O'Connor's first novel. Read full book review >
BAREFOOT DANCER by Barbara O’Connor
BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 6, 1994

"Notes; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
 An evenhanded biography of the famed dancer and choreographer, Isadora Duncan. Read full book review >
MAMMOLINA by Barbara O’Connor
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 11, 1993

"Brief bibliography. (Biography. 8-12)"
 In the ``Creative Minds'' series, Italy's first woman physician (1870-1952)—a pediatrician who later pioneered educating children by using real-life experiences and sensory materials (e.g., sandpaper letters), as well as by observing children to find out how they learn—is an inspiring figure, of special interest to children at Montessori schools but also relevant to others as an influential thinker responsible for many of the precepts of modern education. Read full book review >