Books by Barbara Park

Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"Junie B. still brings a smile, but sometimes it's an uncomfortable one. (Fiction. 5-8)"
It's bound to be a special Thanksgiving feast when Junie B. and her classmates are celebrating. Read full book review >
MA! THERE’S NOTHING TO DO HERE! by Barbara Park
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 22, 2008

"Here" is the womb, from which a boisterous baby speaks with all the subtlety of its sister-under-the-skin, Junie B. In Park's rhyming couplets, the obstreperous babe complains, "I'm all in a heap here. Read full book review >

TOOTHLESS WONDER by Barbara Park
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Good news, people!" Read full book review >

BOSS OF LUNCH by Barbara Park
Released: May 28, 2002

Junie is adjusting to the new world of first grade, where she is learning to follow rules and settle down—at least a little bit. Read full book review >

JUNIE B., FIRST GRADER (AT LAST!) by Barbara Park
Released: Nov. 6, 2001

Starting first grade proves to be a challenge for Junie B. Jones, Park's enduring, irrepressible heroine. Read full book review >

THE GRADUATION OF JAKE MOON by Barbara Park
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

Jake Moon's grandfather Skelly used to be the emotional fixer in Jake's household, the one who soothed his hurts and helped him through hard times. Read full book review >

PSSSST! IT'S ME...THE BOGEYMAN by Barbara Park
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

In this lively number from Park (Mick Harte Was Here, 1995, etc.), the Bogeyman goes on an extended rap-rant to set a few things straight regarding his personality and modus operandi. Read full book review >

MICK HARTE WAS HERE by Barbara Park
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 20, 1995

It's always difficult reading about the death of a child, especially when he's ``one of the neatest kids you'd ever want to meet.'' That's how Phoebe Harte, 13, describes her slightly younger brother Mick, in a poignant story by a writer more associated with making readers laugh (Maxie, Rosie, and Earl—Partners in Grime, 1990, etc.) than cry. Read full book review >

DEAR GOD, HELP!!! LOVE, EARL by Barbara Park
FICTION
Released: May 3, 1993

Earl brings his skewed self-esteem and scathingly funny lowdown to this continuing saga of three oddball friends—Earl, obsessively honest Rosie Swanson, and Max, master of the coined word (``The guy's pewage, Earl''). Read full book review >

Released: Feb. 1, 1993

The fractious kindergartener of Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus (p. 993) has a new baby brother her grandma calls ``the cutest little monkey!'' Junie hasn't seen him yet, but she has told the kids in her class that he's ``A REAL, ALIVE, BABY MONKEY,'' and she's taking bids from her ``bestest'' friends for the first look. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 1, 1992

In the ``First Stepping Stone'' series, a genuinely funny, easily read story. Read full book review >

FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

The stars of Maxie, Rosie, and Earl: Partners in Grime (1990) return, as odd a trio as any in middle-grade fiction. Read full book review >

ALMOST STARRING SKINNYBONES by Barbara Park
Released: March 20, 1988

"Park risks undercutting her own protagonist, but her gamble pays off with a wiser story; middle graders will continue to ask for more."
In response to popular demand, Alex Frankovitch is back, fighting the same old classmates with a new weapon: He's going to be a Star. Read full book review >
THE KID IN THE RED JACKET by Barbara Park
Released: March 15, 1987

"The story's voice usually sounds like that of a real 10-year-old; it might serve to remind a reader in the throes of change that things do get better."
A boy learns to adapt to his new environment in this realistic story. Read full book review >
SKINNYBONES by Barbara Park
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"It's a neat enough outcome for this sort of easy walk."
This opens with sixth-grader Alex sending off a smart-alec entry to a Kitty Fritters commercial contest, but it soon settles into his problem as the smallest, poorest, most humiliated player in the local Little League—as he puts it, referring to his repeated winning of the "most improved player" award, "the only one to go from stinko to smelly six years in a row." Read full book review >