Books by Beverly Swerling

Beverly Swerling is a writer, a consultant, and an avid amateur historian. She lives in New York City with her husband.


BRISTOL HOUSE by Beverly Swerling
Released: April 8, 2013

"This latest effort by Swerling is nicely penned but also ponderous and overloaded with out-of-place sexual vernacular, an overabundance of detail, and a tired, evil Catholic Church conspiracy."
An intricately woven plot with voices from the past give Swerling's latest historical thriller an otherworldly aura. Read full book review >
CITY OF PROMISE by Beverly Swerling
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2011

Swerling (City of Dreams, 2001, etc.) continues her series of "city of" novels celebrating the history of New York.

This installment finds an unhappy young man named Joshua Turner freshly returned to Manhattan from service in the Civil War, during which he's lost a leg along the way and now sports a peg in its place. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2008

"Sure to fascinate even readers who don't know "up-the-town" from "down-the-town.""
In Swerling's fourth Old New York novel (City of Glory, 2007, etc.), the Devreys and the Turners forge new alliances as their city and their rivalry evolve. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Good fun, duly grounded in history."
The Great Mogul diamond, a slave-catching scam and a plot to produce opium in America stir the melodramatic pot in Swerling's riotous tale of New York City, circa 1814. Read full book review >
CITY OF DREAMS by Beverly Swerling
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"The ongoing feuds here often seem like overwrought plot contrivances, a problem aggravated by this newcomer's fossilizing tendency to pack her dialogue with exposition. But early medicine and city history undeniably make for an interesting read."
Ambitious historical novel of New York City's medical practices from the 1630s to the 1780s, a first novel freighted with so much fact and family melodrama it almost sinks under its own weight. Read full book review >