Books by Bill Johnston

STONE UPON STONE by Wieslaw Mysliwski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 15, 2010

"Joyously anchored in the physical world, steeped in storytelling, a delight from start to finish."
Epic novel of rural Poland from two-time Nike Prize winner Mysliwski (The Palace, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
THE MIGHTY ANGEL by Jerzy Pilch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 2009

"A candid, caustic, intensely human depiction of alcoholism."
Winner of Poland's prestigious NIKE Literary Award, and the second of this important Polish writer's works to be translated into English. Read full book review >
FLAW by Magdalena Tulli
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Not for the average reader—or even, maybe, for the above-average reader."
Another arcane exercise from the Polish author of Moving Parts (2005). Read full book review >
NINE by Andrzej Stasiuk
Released: May 1, 2007

"The technique is masterly, and the carefully calibrated atmosphere of dread and threat beautifully sustained. But the effect is that of claustrophobic redundancy."
A kaleidoscopic view of Warsaw in transition and in chaos, following the collapse of Communism, forms the core of this 1999 novel from the Polish author (Tales of Galicia, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
MOVING PARTS by Magdalena Tulli
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Erudite fans of postmodernist language games may find this thrilling, but it's a decidedly acquired taste."
Masquerading as a novel, this latest from Polish experimentalist Tulli (Dreams and Stones, 2004, etc.) is actually a brain-teasing meditation on the conventions of fiction and the strategies of grammar. Read full book review >
BACACAY by Witold Gombrowicz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Johnston's brilliant translations vividly convey the radically unconventional content and style of one of the strangest—and greatest—of writers."
Conformity and logical coherence are rudely deranged in a dozen early tales from Poland's urbane misanthrope (1904–69). Read full book review >
THE NOONDAY CEMETERY by Gustaw Herling
Released: June 24, 2003

"Brilliant work. How did the Nobel Committee manage to overlook Herling?"
A broad generational sweep and a strong sense of the artist's identification with his creations distinguishes this striking collection of the late (1983–96) short fiction of an essential European writer. Read full book review >
HIS CURRENT WOMAN by Jerzy Pilch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"Sheer entertainment."
A comic allegory about the impossibility of attaining complete freedom arises gracefully from the agreeable muddle of this 1995 novel—by a popular Polish writer who has a bit of the early Milan Kundera in him. Read full book review >