Books by Brian Moynahan

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"An intense, incredible story of Russian fortitude and misery."
A history of the Nazis' death grip on Leningrad artist Dmitri Shostakovich and others. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"A well-crafted outing for fans of early modern English history or of fiction rooted in scholarly detection and religious intrigue (e.g., The Name of the Rose and the Caedfael mysteries)."
A tale of doctrinal squabble in the ax-happy England of Henry VIII, from which emerges this important life lesson: never piss off a saint. Read full book review >
THE FAITH by Brian Moynahan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 16, 2002

"Moynahan hopes 'to have caught something of the essence of the faith' on his vast canvas. But it is never clear exactly what that essence might be. Readers in search of a historical understanding of the faith have many better places to look."
An overlong, underinterpreted chronicle of Christianity by a veteran British journalist. Read full book review >
RASPUTIN by Brian Moynahan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 26, 1997

"French ambassador reported, of being run by lunatics. (b&w photos, not seen)"
A biography of the bizarre figure—monk, healer, advisor to the empress, and tireless lecher—who did so much to weaken the monarchy before the Russian Revolution. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 29, 1994

"No mere coffee-table ornament, but a historical document of great drama and unusual intensity."
A spectacular, startling, and sometimes downright grisly chronicle, in words and pictures, of a bloody and tumultuous period. Read full book review >
COMRADES by Brian Moynahan
NON-FICTION
Released: March 17, 1992

"A cautionary tale to be remembered as the infant Commonwealth of Independent States tries to remain democratic and economically viable without veering between anarchy and a new, yet unknown dictatorship. (Maps and b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A tightly focused narrative of the year that Russia overthrew the Romanovs only to fall under the yoke of another despotic government. Read full book review >