Books by Brock Clarke

THE PRICE OF THE HAIRCUT by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 13, 2018

"Where Clarke's novels veer toward social satire, often hilariously so, this uneven collection ranges from the inscrutable to the astounding."
This collection of short fiction features writing as straightforward as the perspective is askew. Read full book review >
EXLEY by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"A seriously playful novel about the interweave of literature and life."
Another literary high-wire performance by a novelist who is establishing himself as a unique voice in contemporary fiction. Read full book review >
AN ARSONIST’S GUIDE TO WRITERS’ HOMES IN NEW ENGLAND by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2007

"A serious novel that is often very funny and will be a page-turning pleasure for anyone who loves literature."
A subversively compelling, multilayered novel about the profound impact of literature (perhaps negative as well as positive). Read full book review >
THE ORDINARY WHITE BOY by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An almost charming hero and a vivid sense of small-town life, but the story fails to make a true claim on the reader's attention—especially when the painstakingly elaborated racial theme dissolves at the end into vapid irrelevancy."
A pallid first novel chronicles a year in the life of a desultory college grad, startled into taking his life seriously by a perhaps racially motivated murder. Read full book review >
WHAT WE WON’T DO by Brock Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"An uneven debut offering an imagination a touch too fond of novelty, a bit too carried away with its own fictive swagger, and a bit too droll in its emotional reticence to capture a reader's enduring interest."
Brock follows his debut novel (The Ordinary White Boy, p. 960) with a prizewinning first collection of 14 stories: a flat if engaging thrum along the themes of loss and despair, in working-class upstate New York, in which mostly male characters find themselves confused in midlife. Read full book review >