Books by Buzz Aldrin

TO THE MOON AND BACK by Buzz Aldrin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 2018

"A stirring first-person account of 'humanity's greatest adventure' marred by distractingly unvarnished special effects. (Informational pop-up. 8-11)"
The second man to walk on the moon tells his tale amid historical photos and pop-up spacecraft. Read full book review >
NO DREAM IS TOO HIGH by Buzz Aldrin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A retread of old material repackaged as an inspirational guidebook. Though aiming to inspire readers of all ages, this will likely appeal to an older readership and devoted fans of Aldrin."
The astronaut recounts life lessons learned from his historic Apollo 11 moonwalk in 1969 and beyond. Read full book review >
MISSION TO MARS by Buzz Aldrin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 7, 2013

"You may say that he's a dreamer; celebrate him as a visionary, or dismiss this as futurist fantasy."
The moonwalking astronaut offers a passionate but not always persuasive manifesto encompassing space tourism and the inevitability of inhabiting Mars within a couple of decades. Read full book review >
MAGNIFICENT DESOLATION by Buzz Aldrin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2009

"An admirable account of an icon of the golden age of space flight."
The troubled but ultimately redeemed life of the second man to walk on the Moon. Read full book review >
LOOK TO THE STARS by Buzz Aldrin
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 2009

There's no doubt about Aldrin's passion for his subject nor his very specialized firsthand knowledge. And as always Minor's paintings are attractive and detailed. Still this follow-up to Reaching for the Moon (2005) feels like an unnecessary addendum rather than a useful and intriguing supplement. The author offers an overview of space exploration, beginning with the contributions of Copernicus, Galileo and Newton and segueing into the work of the Wright brothers, Edwin Hubble and Robert Goddard. Brief descriptions of various NASA missions follow. His personal commentary offers a unique twist, but the brevity of the presentation—a double-page spread for each topic, the first few featuring multiple individuals—may leave readers feeling confused and overwhelmed rather than enlightened. A timeline helps to sort out the sequence of events, and its thumbnail illustrations serve as a sort of visual index, but even here there appears to be too much information squeezed into too small a space. More inspirational than informational, this may please aspiring space explorers but has the potential to leave many listeners in the dark. (Nonfiction. 7-9)Read full book review >
REACHING FOR THE MOON by Buzz Aldrin
BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 2005

In first-person voice, Aldrin highlights points from his childhood that led to his dream of being an astronaut and making the historic moon landing. Coincidental details like his mother's maiden name, "Moon," and his favorite movie hero, the "Lone Ranger," suggest clues to his destiny. After West Point, he joined the Air Force because "he wanted to fly more than anything." Minor's usual beautiful and realistic illustrations effectively convey spatial perspectives and movement, adding depth to the narrative. However, the cover design and type layout are confusing, indicative of a biography instead of an autobiography—a brief intro could have clarified it. Aldrin's message in an author's note avows, "If you set your sights high, you may accomplish more than you ever dreamed." Pair this with Don Brown's One Giant Step for a child's-eye view on space exploration. (Flight/space exploration chronology) (Picture book/biography. 6-9)Read full book review >
ENCOUNTER WITH TIBER by Buzz Aldrin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 1996

Alien-contact/ancient-astronaut ``infotainment'' from Aldrin, the second man on the moon (Men from Earth, 1989, etc.) and leading novelist Barnes (Mother of Storms, 1994, etc.). By 2006, various space programs proceed in desultory fashion, spurred mostly by private enterprise and the prospect of space tourism. Then a message arrives from Alpha Centauri revealing the presence of alien encyclopedias on the moon and Mars, left by visiting alien Tiberians in 7000 B.C. In an attempt to recover the encyclopedia on the moon, Earth's leading astronaut, Chris Terence, dies, and the encyclopedia is destroyed. So, a multinational effort gears up to reach Mars and recover the information at all costs. Among all that alien advanced technology, investigators discover, is a chronicle describing how the Tiberians—``alien'' mostly in a metaphorical sense—sent forth starships from their doomed homeworld to colonize as many new planets as they could. The first Tiberian expedition, touching down in the Middle East, resulted in a bloodbath and their enslavement by Stone Age humans. Fifty years later, a wiser second expedition rescued the survivors and determined just in time that the Tiberians couldn't survive on Earth permanently due to biochemical incompatibilities; they retreated to the moon and then to Mars, where they died out. Bulging with facts and explanations—most of them, unfortunately, at the expense of plot, character, and narrative momentum. Still, Aldrin brings an unmistakable hands-on realism to the details of space exploration, and Barnes lends his expertise to the overall structure and packaging. (Author tour) Read full book review >