Books by Chris Bunch

Chris Bunch is a full-time novelist following his career as a television writer. A military veteran, he is the author of the bestselling Last Legion Series, the Sten series, The Seer King trilogy, and The Demon King. He lives in Washington on the Columbia


KNIGHTHOOD OF THE DRAGON by Chris Bunch
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2006

"Too little original thought, too many hackneyed situations and characterizations."
Mediocre military adventure, the second in a trilogy that began with Dragonmaster (2005). Read full book review >
THE WARRIOR KING by Chris Bunch
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

Final installment of Bunch's military sword and sorcery trilogy (The Seer King, 1997; The Demon King, not seen), again with regulation plotting and magics, graphic sex, and lots of well-handled, gory action. This one describes the final showdown between the good-guy narrator, General Damastes, recalled from imprisonment and exile, and his former friend, the evil wizard Tenedos. At stake is the soul of Numantia, a kingdom that has been occupied by a foreign power, Maisir, following Tenedos's disastrous invasion attempt. Here, Tenedos wants it all: he's lean, mean, back from the dead, and demon-powered; and only Damastes, who knows Tenedos so well, might stop him. A pale, barely differentiated shadow of what started out as a limited but reasonably satisfying yarn; still, fans of the previous will want to give it the once-over. Read full book review >
THE SEER KING by Chris Bunch
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

Military sword and sorcery, from the co-author of Kingdoms of the Night (with Allan Cole, 1995, etc.) The former kingdom of Numantia is governed by an effete oligarchy known as the Rule of Ten. As a young, untried cavalry officer, narrator Damastes is sent with his troop to escort a diplomatic mission led by the seer (magician) Tenedos into a bandit-infested border country of Kait. But opposed by Kait's greedy boss—Baber Fergana and his sorcerer, Irshad, not to mention by a powerful demon called Thak and his strangler-assassin Tovieti cult—Tenedos and Damastes barely escape with a handful of survivors. Soon, however, Thak moves into the Numantian capital, Nicias, followed rapidly by the Tovieti with their yellow silk strangling cords, while another enemy, the sorcerer Chardin Sher, brews up spells more powerful than those of Tenedos. Despite all this, the Rule of Ten refuse to take action, and Nicias is engulfed by civil war. Tenedos and Damastes have no choice but to seize control of Numantia, then face further military and sorcerous challenges before Tenedos openly declares himself emperor. A fantasy sex- and violence-fest, courtesy of Bunch's sure grasp of military history and organization, gory battles interspersed with interludes of graphic sex, and dialogue peppered with incongruous modern expletives. The text, while complete in itself, seems to promise at least one sequel. Read full book review >
KINGDOMS OF THE NIGHT by Allan Cole
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1995

Third in the Far Kingdoms fantasy series (The Warrior's Tale, 1994, etc.). The previous hero, Amalric Antero, has grown prematurely old and weary in his adventuresome quests to bring prosperity to the city of Orissa. But now a young woman, Janela, claims to be the granddaughter of Amalric's former companion, the sorcerer Janos Greycloak. Janela announces that she alone knows the whereabouts of the real Far Kingdoms. Unable to resist a challenge, Amalric journeys with her to Tyrenia, the Kingdoms of the Night, whose well-meaning but ineffectual ruler, Prince Solaros, is beset by demons ruled by the dreadful King Ba'land; the demons threaten not only Tyrenia but the entire world. Eventually, Amalric and Janela will shrug off their bodies to go traveling on the psychic plane. Overlong but agreeable fare for series fans. Read full book review >
THE WARRIOR'S TALE by Allan Cole
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

Amalric Antero, hero of The Far Kingdoms (1993), is the younger brother of this sequel's leading character, the rough, tough, lesbian captain of the Maranon Guard. Hitherto denied a proper warrior's job because of her womanhood, Rali leads her all- women Guards in a counterattack upon the powerful and irascible Archons of Lycanth. She slays one Archon, but the other escapes with a doomsday spell that threatens the entire world. Aided by the wise wizard Gamelan, Rali pursues the vanished Archon, meanwhile uncovering within herself unexpected magical abilities. Finally, after the usual strange journeys, battles, betrayals, reverses, and lopped body parts, the showdown occurs in the Archons' sorcerous Iron Castle on the spirit plane. In sum, the recipe much as before: imaginative, prolonged, pedestrian, and about as subtle as a runaway train. Read full book review >
THE FAR KINGDOMS by Allan Cole
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

First hardcover outing for the authors of numerous paperback fantasy collaborations. Young trader's son Amalric of the port city of Orissa must soon depart on his test-of-character voyage, known as Finding His Tradewind. With warrior-scholar Janos Graycloak, Amalric decides to search for the fabulous Far Kingdoms. One small complication: They must take along one member of the local magician's guild, or Evocators, in this case the weak and treacherous Cassini—who, true to type, betrays and abandons them in a far, perilous land. Returning to Orissa, Amalric and Janos find Cassini stirring up the Evocators against them, while Amalric's father lies dying. Later, their second expedition falls foul of Cassini and the hereditary enemies of Amalric's family. Escaping from vile magical imprisonment, Amalric and Janos return to Orissa, this time to overthrow the Evocators and triumphantly mount a third expedition. Finally, they reach the Far Kingdoms, which are indeed rich and powerful with magic. Amalric sees plenty of opportunities for trade with Orissa, but Janos, meanwhile, becomes obsessed with Far Kingdom magic and eventually loses his soul to the Dark Seeker; Amalric is forced to kill him. Churning but undistinguished. Read full book review >