Books by Claire Alexander

THE BEST PART OF DADDY'S DAY by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 12, 2016

"A pleasant celebration of father-and-son love. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bertie the beagle wants to grow up to be a builder, just like his dad. Read full book review >
MONKEY AND THE LITTLE ONE by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 5, 2015

"The story looks beautiful, but the depths of the issue are never plumbed. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A mouse disturbs a monkey's tranquility but soon turns from irksome to indispensable in Alexander's tale of friendship's often strange course. Read full book review >
BACK TO FRONT AND UPSIDE DOWN by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"While Stan's improvement is a little too good to be true, Alexander's message is clear: 'We all have to ask for help sometimes.' (Picture book. 4-7)"
A little dog who has trouble with the mechanics of writing musters up the courage to ask his teacher for help. Read full book review >
SMALL FLORENCE, PIGGY POP STAR by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

Alexander's book is a pleasure to gaze upon. The artwork is sumptuous, like great dollops of ice cream, the colors bold in some instances, commingling with an eye for harmony in others, the line work fine and wiry. The story follows Florence, a young pig with big dreams of singing stardom but hog-tied by her shrinking-violet nature. She can barely manage a squeak when her mildly bullying older sisters, also singers, challenge her to show her stuff. When a TV singing contest comes to town, the older sisters try to grab the limelight but succumb to stage fright, while Florence belts out a winning tune from the audience. Despite the lovely French curves of music issuing from Florence's snout, her sudden instinct to public warbling lacks any rationale. The story doesn't turn on anything; without some imaginative impulse, the sisters' balking and Florence's newfound voice are airy contrivances. Still, the illustrations are of such quality as to nearly float the project by fashioning a narrative of their own. Florence caught in the spotlight is alone worth 1,000 carefully crafted words. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
LUCY AND THE BULLY by Claire Alexander
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

Lucy, a primary grader, is good at art to the delight of all her classmates, except for Tommy. The little bull acts out by stomping on her model blackbird, ripping her storybook and breaking her pencils, each time threatening lamb Lucy with the classic "or else!" if she should tell. But after a week of bullying, Lucy can't conceal her misery from her mother, who promptly calls Ms. Goosie. "That night Lucy couldn't sleep. She was afraid of what would happen the next day." The acrylics are both bright and textured and have a lovely transparent quality, even when using bold color with soft black outlines, suiting the emotional tenor of the tale nicely. Readers never see the punishment meted out to Tommy, but his own unhappiness comes through to them and to Lucy, who extends a conciliatory trotter. As a model for resolution, this stands out; regrettably, bullying is not often resolved so easily. The foreword, by a staff therapist at Northwestern's Family Institute, provides tips for parents and teachers on using stories in bullying-prevention programs. (Picture book. 4-8) Read full book review >