Books by Clifford E. Landers

BELLINI AND THE SPHINX by Tony Bellotto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 5, 2019

"Bellotto's detective, less ironic and more earnest in his angst than his American counterparts, proves a compelling guide to the passionate world of São Paulo."
Originally published in Portuguese in 1995, Bellotto's series opener introduces Remo Bellini, a private eye in the tradition of Spade and Marlowe but distinctively Brazilian. Read full book review >
SÃO PAULO NOIR by Tony Bellotto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2018

"In the year of #MeToo, Bellotto's Akashic entry has a timely feel, giving noir a host of feminine faces."
Bellotto has no trouble discovering dark doings in what he describes as "the most populous city in Brazil, the Americas, the Portuguese-speaking world, and the entire Southern Hemisphere." Read full book review >
THE LADY OF SOLITUDE by Paula Parisot
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 2016

"A distressingly detached collection."
A Brazilian author's debut explores ennui and obsession among young sophisticates. Read full book review >
VOICES OF THE DESERT by Nélida Piñon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 5, 2009

"Emphasizing the teller rather than the tales, the author weaves an intricate narrative of aesthetics and sexual politics."
Brazilian novelist Piñon (Caetana's Sweet Song, 1992, etc.) forcefully brings out the erotic element in Scheherazade's difficult and delicate situation as she spins the stories of One Thousand and One Nights to the Caliph of Baghdad. Read full book review >
PEDRA CANGA by Tereza Albues
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2001

Brazilian author Albues's 1987 novel is a lusty and likable compact chronicle of a "wetlands" village (Pedra Canga) whose inhabitants are oppressed by, and eventually liberated from, the malign influence of the wealthy family who has long exploited them. The unnamed narrator, a fledgling woman writer, gathers fragmentary stories about the "demonic" Vergare clan from a vigorously described townful of larger-than-life eccentrics, including the Vergares' terrified servant Nivalda (a reputed "witch"), puritanical spinster and hell-raiser Ludovica Hosteater, and the narrator's own ribald, Zorba-like grandfather ("always fond of parties, guitars, and rum"). An empty house inexplicably changes colors, ghosts and zombies mingle casually with the living, and a cleansing storm ultimately restores order: a wry magical-realist tale that Albues expertly shapes into a colorfully bawdy and exuberant celebration of life. Read full book review >
TWELVE FINGERS by Jô Soares
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 21, 2001

"A lot of fun, in between groans, and a real improvement over Soares's rather thin first novel. This one really ought to be filmed."
A larky comic picaresque—a cross between Jaroslav Hasek's The Good Soldier Schweik and Woody Allen's Zelig—from Brazilian TV talk-show host Soares (A Samba for Sherlock, 1997). Read full book review >
IRACEMA by José de Alencar
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

Iracema ($25.00; Jan.; 160 pp.; 0-19-511547-3): This addition to Oxford's invaluable Library of Latin America (see also Blest Gana and de Almeida, above and below) is a new translation of a classic Brazilian novel first published in 1865. In depicting the defiant love affair between young Indian woman Iracema (the letters of whose name, rearranged, spell —America—) and a Portuguese soldier (Martim), de Alencar constructs an allegory of native Brazil's subjugation by colonialist Europe, which, amazingly enough, views both cultures with roughly equal amounts of irony and compassion. Floridly romantic and undeniably dated, but, still, a seminal and important work. It isn—t seamless, but there's a greatness in it. Read full book review >