Books by Colin Dexter

THE REMORSEFUL DAY by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

Dexter (Death is Now My Neighbor, 1997, etc.) draws a brilliantly realized series to a close by relying on the irascible Morse's extraordinary —capacity of thinking laterally, vertically, and diagonally.— This time, though, Morse seems reluctant to get involved in the unsolved year-old murder of 50-ish promiscuous nurse Yvonne Hamilton. Read full book review >

DEATH IS NOW MY NEIGHBOR by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 1997

The ferocious intelligence that always blazes out of Dexter's Oxford mysteries makes Lonsdale College, where two ambitious candidates are jockeying to replace the retiring Master, a logical focus for this one. Read full book review >

MORSE'S GREATEST MYSTERY by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

Eleven stories, including six featuring irascible, imposingly well-read Inspector Morse. Read full book review >

THE DAUGHTERS OF CAIN by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1995

Inimitably cantankerous Chief Inspector Morse—in his 11th stint—takes over a case that seems utterly straightforward (though it baffled the colleague he relieved): the murder of a retired Oxford historian who found out too much about the drug- related suicide of one of his neighbors in Wolsey College. Read full book review >

THE WAY THROUGH THE WOODS by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1993

Vacationing Chief Inspector Morse's eye is caught by a Times story about an anonymous poem evidently referring to the year-old disappearance of Swedish student Karin Eriksson. Read full book review >

THE JEWEL THAT WAS OURS by Colin Dexter
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1992

For Dexter, a decidedly conventional outing, this one involving an American tour group and their Oxford guides and Inspector Morse's investigation into who among them pilfered the Wolvercote Jewel, a Saxon buckle that Mrs. Laura Stratton was planning on presenting to the Ashmolean Museum. Read full book review >