Books by Dan Brown

ORIGIN by Dan Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"The plot is absurd, of course, but the book is a definitive pleasure. Prepare to be absorbed—and in more ways than one."
Another Brown (Inferno, 2013, etc.) blockbuster, blending arcana, religion, and skulduggery—sound familiar?—with the latest headlines. Read full book review >
THE DA VINCI CODE by Dan Brown
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A satisfying adaptation for teens who want their thrills clean. (Thriller. 12-16)"
The bestselling page-turner, adapted for young readers. Read full book review >
INFERNO by Dan Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 14, 2013

"Ace symbologist Robert Langdon returns, and the world trembles. Perfect escapist reading for fans."
Brown's (The Lost Symbol, 2009, etc.) latest, in which a very bad guy is convinced that there are entirely too many people roaming the surface of the planet, and, because he's a fan of Dante and the Plague both, he's set to unleash inferno upon the world. Read full book review >
THE DA VINCI CODE by Dan Brown
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 18, 2003

"Bulky, balky, talky."
In an updated quest for the Holy Grail, the narrative pace remains stuck in slo-mo. Read full book review >
DECEPTION POINT by Dan Brown
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Although Brown is a more astute storyteller than most of his brethren in the technothriller vein, and won't lose any fans this time out, he's never able to convincingly marry the technical and the human sides of Deception Point."
A mostly tedious third technothriller from the author of Angels and Demons (2000), etc. Read full book review >
ANGELS AND DEMONS by Dan Brown
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2000

"Romance, religion, science, murder, mysticism, architecture, action. Go!"
Another near-future technothriller from the author of Digital Fortress (1998). Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon gets a call from Maximilian Kohler, director of CERN's Geneva particle-physics research complex. Physicist Leonardo Vetra has been murdered, and a quantity of dreadfully dangerous antimatter stolen; worse, Vetra was branded with a single word: Illuminati. Langdon's an expert on the history of the Illuminati, a medieval pro-science, anti-Catholic power group, often suspected of infiltrating mighty institutions but now considered extinct. The canister of antimatter soon turns up—in Rome, hidden somewhere in Vatican City, just as the church's cardinals are gathering to select a new pope. When the canister's batteries go dead—boom. As bad, someone's kidnapped the four top cardinals, and a message from the Illuminati states that one cardinal will be killed—with lots of Illuminati symbolism—every hour until the antimatter explodes. Langdon and Vetra's scientist daughter, Vittoria, must convince the late pope's chamberlain, now in charge of the Vatican until the new pope is elected, to help them unravel the mysteries of the Illuminati and, perhaps, save the cardinals from gruesome deaths. But they'll be going up against a wily and potent Illuminati assassin, causing plenty of thrilling cat-and-mouse maneuvers and life-or-death cliffhangers. And how come the powerful head of the Illuminati knows all the Vatican's secrets, and can enter and leave at will? Read full book review >
A PICTURE BOOK OF SACAGAWEA by David A. Adler
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 15, 2000

Adler is the author of the wide-ranging and market-savvy Picture Book Biography series that now tops 25 titles. Here he focuses on his first Native American figure, the Shoshone woman Sacagawea, the only woman in the Lewis and Clark Louisiana Purchase "Corps of Discovery." Adler's reliable no-nonsense approach is inclusive enough to satisfy most second- through third-grade biography readers' needs, but those seeking inspiration or validation will need to look elsewhere. Most of the familiar elements of Sacagawea's life are here: the approximate place and date of birth; death of her mother in a raid by a rival tribe; her marriage to a French trapper Charbonneau; joining the expedition with her husband; the birth of her son Jean Baptiste; her ability to communicate with other native peoples; her wide ranging knowledge of edible plants; etc. Unfortunately, Adler's prose style is flat-footed. Even when recounting some of the more interesting bits (the fact that she carried her son on a cradleboard throughout most of the expedition; an unexpected reunion with her brother; how she saved the expedition's medicines in a canoeing accident), the text communicates neither excitement nor pride of purpose. Brown's awkward watercolor art can't rescue this from mundane. The cover and interior depictions of a sweet-faced, pig-tailed adult Sacagawea are greeting-card bland, and most figure groups are awkwardly composed. A barely additional purchase. (Picture book biography. 7-9) Read full book review >
DIGITAL FORTRESS by Dan Brown
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 10, 1998

A technothriller, less improbable than some, involving computers, cryptography, and government paranoia. In Brown's hard-working debut, Commander Trevor Strathmore, the NSA's deputy director of operations, has invented TRANSLTR, a top-secret super-computer that by brute force can crack any encryption code in an hour or two. Then Strathmore discovers Digital Fortress, an encryption algorithm written by crippled ex- NSA genius Ensei Tankado, that the TRANSLTR can't break, so he calls in his head of cryptography, Susan Fletcher, to help. Seems that Tankado has posted a copy of Digital Fortress, encrypted with its own algorithm, on the Internet and has offered to sell his password to the highest bidder. But then Tankado turns up dead in Spain, his ring (with a copy of the password) missing, so Strathmore dispatches linguist David Becker (Susan's significant other) to get the ring. What neither Susan nor Becker knows is that Strathmore has his own agenda concerning Digital Fortress and Becker (he's in love with Susan and intends for Becker to be killed). Susan, meanwhile, searches for Tankado's partner, codenamed NDAKOTA, and the other copy of the password. Her suspicions focus on obnoxious coworker Greg Hale and his e-mail account. Becker finds the ring but then is shot—just as Susan and the NSA bigwigs slowly come to understand the effects of Strathmore's plotting: He's accidentally infected TRANSLTR with a computer worm that will leave the NSA's files open to hackers everwhere! Finally, just as the NSA's defenses collapse, Becker rises from the apparently dead to produce the magic ring. Inordinately complicated but reasonably exciting; should find a home in the middle reaches of the intelligence-bureau/techno-whiz readership. Read full book review >