Books by David A. Kelly

THE GOLD MEDAL MESS by David A.  Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 24, 2016

"This series opener is a promising venture into early Matt Christopher territory. (Mystery/sports fiction. 7-9)"
When a mysterious saboteur threatens to shut down their school's Olympic games, five young athletes put on their detective shoes. Read full book review >
MIRACLE MUD by David A.  Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"For young fans who love the odd, fun details of baseball. (author's note, statistics) (Informational picture book. 6-11)"
A baseball entrepreneur finds a solution to a long-standing technical problem. Read full book review >
THE FENWAY FOUL-UP by David A.  Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 22, 2011

A new series for emerging chapter-book readers combines the allure of baseball parks with the challenge of solving a mystery. Mike and Kate have tickets to a Red Sox game and an all-access pass to the park, courtesy of Kate's mom, a sportswriter. The pass comes in handy when it's reported that star player Big D's lucky bat has been stolen, as it allows them to help find the thief. Historical details about Fenway Park, including the secret code found on the manual scoreboard, a look at Wally the mascot and a peek into the gift shop, will keep the young baseball fan reading, even when the actual mystery of the missing bat falls a little flat. Writing mysteries for very young readers is a challenge—the puzzle has to be easy enough to solve while sustaining readers' interest. This slight adventure is more baseball-park travel pamphlet than mystery, a vehicle for providing interesting details about one of the hallowed halls of baseball. Not a homerun, but certainly a double for the young enthusiast. On deck? The Pinstripe Ghost, also out on Feb. 22, 2011. (historical notes) (Mystery. 6-9)Read full book review >
BABE RUTH AND THE BASEBALL CURSE by David A.  Kelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 2009

Two nonfiction baseball stories enclosed in one cover should be a winner for newly established readers who are baseball fanatics—unfortunately, it's not. The first is a thin sketch of the life of The Babe, the Bambino, George Herman Ruth, bad boy turned national hero, a figure larger than life. Too thin, alas: The Babe was so outsized, so personable, so human, and not enough of that comes through in this. The second story is the sad tale of the fall of the Boston Red Sox after The Babe was sold to the hated New York Yankees. Following that fateful event, Boston was in decline for decades as New York was in ascendancy. It's an exciting story, but Kelly's writing is flat, dependent on exclamation points and forms of "to get" instead of strong, chewy verbs—lazy and inexcusable writing in a book meant for developing readers. Furthermore, even as the book appears on shelves it is outdated, making no mention of Barry Bonds or of the Red Sox's ignominious defeat in 2008. Too bad. (Nonfiction. 6-9)Read full book review >