Books by David B. Coe

David B. Coe is the author of Rules of Ascension and Seeds of Betrayal in the Winds of the Foreland series and won the Crawford Award for Best First Fantasy for Children of Amarid and The Outlanders, the first two books of his LonTobyn trilogy. He lives i


THE SORCERERS’ PLAGUE by David B. Coe
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2007

"For the author's fans, and for younger readers who may still find freshness in fantasy of this type."
Volume one of a new series, this is epic fantasy with an Important Moral Lesson. Read full book review >
SHAPERS OF DARKNESS by David B. Coe
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 27, 2005

"Enjoyable but slow-moving."
Penultimate volume of the Winds of the Forelands series, following Bonds of Vengeance (2005), in which two races—the Eandi and the Qirsi—battle for dominance. Read full book review >
RULES OF ASCENSION by David B. Coe
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2001

"Overall, a strong opening. Coming up: Seeds of Betrayal."
The award-winning author of the LonTobyn Chronicles (Eagle-Sage, 2000, etc.) kicks off a fresh four-part fantasy series. Unlike many sword-and-sorcery authors, Coe wields a good clear style devoid of clichés, although his lively plot centered on enspelled feudal societies, is at heart familiar stuff. The Forelands is divided up into seven countries, each with its own formidable castle, duke, and sorcerers of varying powers. The story opens with the return of a pestilence carried by fleas on mice. Pytor, a farmer who has lost his wife and two children as well as livestock, rebels at his Duke's proclamation of a Feast at which farmers are invited into the fortress and wined and dined while the Duke's sorcerers raze the land, houses, and beasts, to kill the fleas. Pytor deliberately gets bitten and goes to the Feast with the pestilence raging in him. Main characters working out their intertwined Fatings include the two assassins hired by Chancellor Cresenne of Aneira to kill the gleaner Grinsa. The assassins fail, but not before Cresenne falls for Grinsa and becomes pregnant with a child certain to take over the series. Read full book review >
EAGLE-SAGE by David B. Coe
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2000

"articulate or dramatize them, though the fans will want to know how it all comes out."
Third and final part of Coe's fantasy LonTobyn Chronicle (The Read full book review >
THE OUTLANDERS by David B. Coe
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 30, 1998

Second entry in a projected fantasy trilogy (The Children of Amarid, 1997) about the attempted invasion of rural, magic-powered Tobyn-Ser by technology-powered, industrialized Lon-Ser. The mages of Tobyn-Ser have learned from their Outlander prisoner, Baram, that the attacks on their land emanate from a vast, polluted city called Bragor-Nal, even though the sovereigns of Lon-Ser deny all knowledge of the attacks. So the mage Orris agrees to travel to Lon-Ser to try and sort out the situation, and also to return the stir-crazy Baram to his home. In Bragor-Nal, meanwhile, the Overlord Cedrych, originator of the attacks, engages Nal-lord Melyor to renew the invasion attempt. When Orris arrives, he soon wins over the ambitious Melyor, whose ancestors were exiled Tobyn-Ser magicians; but the sovereigns don't want to get involved, and it seems the only way to stop a new invasion is to kill Cedrych. Typically long-winded but reasonably innovative and engaging. Read full book review >
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1997

First of a sword-and-sorcery series in which, a thousand years ago, Amarid and Theron founded a magical order whose new members become mages by acquiring bird familiars (necessary for the magic to work), staffs, and ceryll crystals, which focus and project the magic. Now, someone impersonating a mage is spreading death and destruction across Tobyn-Ser, so confidence in the real Children of Amarid collapses. The mage Baden, accepting his nephew Jaryd as apprentice, heads for a big meeting of the Children, hoping to discuss the matter and determine who's behind it. But the mages are argumentative and complacent, agreeing on little, so Baden arranges a dangerous trek to consult Theron's huffy ghost (a task no one has survived). Afterward, the powerful mage Sartol, a traitor secretly in league with invaders using advanced technology to counterfeit magic powers, claims that Baden's the traitor and that Jaryd was killed by Theron's ghost! The birds are merely a nuisance; otherwise, this hardworking if glum and unambitious debut might just—but only just—keep a nostril above the flood of mediocre fantasy currently sloshing about. Read full book review >