Books by David Eddings

THE REDEMPTION OF ALTHALUS by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 26, 2000

"Full of the usual jolly banter that passes for wit, creamy smooth and blandly unsurprising."
Stand-alone fantasy, already a bestseller in the UK, from the vastly popular husband-and-wife team (The Rivan Codex, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Fanatics only."
Already a smash hit in the UK, this latest addition to the Belgariad and Malloreon cycles (most recently, Polgara the Sorceress, 1997), featuring evil gods, kings, sorcerers, orbs, and whatnots, comprises a wretched jumble of unreconstructed notes together with gnarled, gnomic utterances—that is to say, background material accumulated before the authors wrote the stories themselves. Read full book review >
POLGARA THE SORCERESS by David Eddings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Omniquel?"
Already a runaway bestseller in the UK, this latest doorstopper fantasy from the husband-and-wife team expands upon the events encompassing two huge five-book sagas, The Belgariad and The Malloreon, plus a sequel-cum-companion volume, Belgarath the Sorcerer (1995). Read full book review >
BELGARATH THE SORCERER by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Don't get trampled in the rush."
Here, finally, is the imposing prequel to The Belgariad (five fat volumes) and The Malloreon (another five volumes, all just as large, most recently The Seeress of Kell, 1991). Read full book review >
THE HIDDEN CITY by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"The story's propelled by magic, a kidnapped Queen Ehlana, and the release of a power called Klael — who's so evil that, by comparison, the stuff that slipped out of Pandora's box is spilled milk."
In the third volume of the Tamuli (after The Shining Ones, 1993, etc.), bestselling author Eddings continues his fantasy saga as Sparhawk, knight and good guy, battles the foul God Cyrgon, a very bad guy. Read full book review >
THE SHINING ONES by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"At least those who enjoyed volume one should be happy; non-fans need not bother."
Book Two of Eddings's latest trilogy (Domes of Fire, 1992): a second set of yarns about the Pandion Knight, Sparhawk, his wife, Queen Ehlana, and a supporting cast of thousands. Read full book review >
DOMES OF FIRE by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"482), but another three volumes of this will tax even the moat loyal of fans."
Book One of yet another fantasy trilogy, itself a sequel to a trilogy, The Elenium (concluded with The Sapphire Rose, not seen), which chronicled the Pandion knight Sparhawk's defeat of the evil god Azash. Read full book review >
THE LOSERS by David Eddings
Released: June 1, 1992

"For non-fans of Eddings's fantasies, to which this bears not the slightest resemblance: an unexpected pleasure."
A rare mainstream outing (High Hunt, 1973) from bestselling fantasist Eddings: an often disconcerting scrutiny of people seemingly fated to end up on life's acrapheap. Read full book review >
THE SEERESS OF KELL by David Eddings
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1991

"Fans and nonfans alike will rejoice that the series is concluded at last."
Fifth and final chunk of Eddings's enormous Good vs. Read full book review >
SORCERESS OF DARSHIVA by David Eddings
Released: Dec. 1, 1989

"If Eddings deserves his fans—no question but what he works hard, so evidently he does—then his fans certainly deserve him."
Chunk the Fourth of Eddings' best-selling mega-epic (most recently Demon Lord of Karanda, 1988). Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1989

"Nothing succeeds like success."
Business as usual in churn-'em-out land: Eddings, he of the white-hot word processor, embarks on a shiny, brand-new fantasy even before wrapping up the one in progress (The Malloreon, most recently Demon Lord of Karanda). Read full book review >
DEMON LORD OF KARANDA by David Eddings
Released: Sept. 19, 1988

"Success!"
Like the stewed, gnarled, irredeemable epics of Stephen Donaldson before him, Eddings' preposterous books—and their inevitable appearance on the best-seller lists—prove only that fantasy fans like what they like, regardless of originality, narrative skill, insight, in fact any positive qualities whatsoever. Read full book review >
THE KING OF THE MURGOS by David Eddings
Released: March 15, 1988

"Baffling that anyone would choose to read such unmitigated drivel, but there it is: look for Eddings fans to show up in droves."
Of Eddings' projected five-book epic, The Malloreon, this is book—or, better, chunk—two. Read full book review >
GUARDIANS OF THE WEST by David Eddings
Released: April 1, 1987

"Lots of huffing-puffing stage-setting, then, but of real substance there is none."
Eddings' hard-over debut is the first of a new sword & sorcery series and a sequel to his five-part paperback Belgariad. Read full book review >
HIGH HUNT by David Eddings
Released: Feb. 20, 1972

"Sentimental in spots, hairy in others, but genuinely likable and potentially photovisual — a four-ounce shot of 100 proof liquor for the men who take theirs neat."
On the surface, in fact high up on the surface in the mountains of Washington, this is a pretty good action story which separates the men from the boys. Read full book review >

"Heroic travelogue with lots of jolly banter and one or two confrontations with Evil: another one where the knights ride errantly forth while the plot stays home to sulk."
In The Diamond Throne (1989), Eddings wrote of how Ehlana, Queen of Elenia, had been poisoned, then frozen in crystal to save her life, while her knight and champion, Sparhawk, galloped off to find the talisman Bhelliom, the jewel whose power can save her life. Read full book review >