Books by David Means

HYSTOPIA by David Means
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 19, 2016

"Means' first novel is a compelling portrait of an imagined counterhistory that feels entirely real."
In an alternative universe, John F. Kennedy was not killed in Dealey Plaza, but America is riven by Vietnam nonetheless. Read full book review >
THE SPOT by David Means
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2010

"Though the author teaches at Vassar, these stories have a lot more punch and life than academic, creative-writing exercises."
A virtuosic short-story collection by the prize-winning author. Read full book review >
THE SECRET GOLDFISH by David Means
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 2004

"Black/bleak comedies of moral and spiritual breakdown."
Fifteen stories in a third collection by the prizewinning Means (Assorted Fire Events, 2000, etc.): tales set mostly in harsh northern areas of the Midwest among people the rest of us would rather avoid. Read full book review >
ASSORTED FIRE EVENTS by David Means
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"A few of the longer, more conventional tales flesh out character and eschew the simply bizarre to explore the landscape of the God-worried, the guilt-ridden, the death-haunted. But Means's artsy gestures undercut his better intentions."
A second collection by the author of A Quick Kiss of Redemption (1991) continues the search for redemption in short fictions (some from Harper's, most from little mags) that borrow their lyric style from the groggiest sort of contemporary long-line poetry. Dabbling in self-consciousness, Means plays with punctuation and ellipses; he often goes streamy when the narrative most demands clarity. Read full book review >
A QUICK KISS OF REDEMPTION by David Means
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 21, 1991

"Means's stories all have their moments and, in most cases, an ease of voice—but without a strong sense of place or exceptional dialogue, they fail to leave a lasting impression."
Means shows a talent for strong visual images in this first collection, but, unfortunately, few of the stories themselves have an equally strong impact. Read full book review >