Books by David Peace

PATIENT X by David Peace
Released: Sept. 5, 2018

"Quiet homage to the progenitor of the modern Japanese short story."
An imaginative glimpse behind the curtain of a sheltered, definitively troubled writer of a century past. Read full book review >
RED OR DEAD by David Peace
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 27, 2014

"A novel without a single quote in 736 fast-paced pages—but one that might be quoted for decades."
A story of faith, ambition, socialism and a last-place English football club, combining a true story with eternal truths. Read full book review >
OCCUPIED CITY by David Peace
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 4, 2010

"Powerful and ambitious, this British import is deepened by a multiperspective, Rashômon-like approach. But reader be warned: The immensely talented Peace (Tokyo Year Zero, 2007 etc.) is not in the business of making his work easy."
A man walks into a Tokyo bank, and when he walks out, 12 of its 16 employees are dead. Read full book review >
TOKYO YEAR ZERO by David Peace
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 13, 2007

"The Japanese-ness Peace layers on may be overwhelming for some readers—there is, for example, no equivalent for the constant stream of apologies out of everyone's mouth—and the psychosis is tough going, but crime readers may fancy the change of scenery."
A Tokyo policeman tries to sort out a series of murders one year after the surrender to the Americans. Read full book review >
NINETEEN EIGHTY THREE by David Peace
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2003

"Total eclipse of the heart."
Fourth and last in this British author's experimental Red Riding Quartet crime epic: a raw and furious wade through the Valley of Death that understates its big sweet hell of pages chock-a-block with violated corpses and red rain running with blood. Read full book review >
NINETEEN SEVENTY-SEVEN by David Peace
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"The big sweet hell of a sleepover in bloody hospital rubbish, with pieces of bone, lumps of brain, and white panties."
Admirers of last year's Nineteen Seventy-Four (the first in the Red Riding Quartet), awash in cut up bodies, castration, girls scalped, strangled, stuff like that may sit back and fix themselves a rich second helping of the same bloody pudding, now even worse, if the tum-tum's game. Read full book review >