Books by Deb Pilutti

OLD ROCK (IS NOT BORING) by Deb Pilutti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 4, 2020

"This picture book rocks! (Picture book. 4-8)"
A witty, engaging exploration of deep time. Read full book review >
THE SECRETS OF NINJA SCHOOL by Deb Pilutti
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 20, 2018

"No need for a black body suit to be a ninja-in-training. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Along with learning typical skills, each student at ninja school develops a special, individual one—except, apparently, for Ruby. Read full book review >
IDEA JAR by Adam Lehrhaupt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 6, 2018

"A stellar idea for the idea jar, but the result may stay on the shelf. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A child directly addresses readers and potential writers to share one way of getting stories started. Read full book review >
BEAR AND SQUIRREL ARE FRIENDS...YES, REALLY! by Deb Pilutti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A nifty, expectation-defying read-aloud. (Picture book. 4-8) "
They might look very different, but Bear and Squirrel are friends. Read full book review >
TEN RULES OF BEING A SUPERHERO by Deb Pilutti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"This book is starchier than a superhero story ought to be, but almost everyone will agree with rule 10: '[S]aving the day is more fun with a friend.' (Picture book. 4-7)"
There are 10 rules of being a superhero, but the second is the most important: "Saving the day is messy." Read full book review >
THE CITY KID & THE SUBURB KID by Deb Pilutti
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

The classic fable gets an update and a clever book design in this debut. Jack's life in the city is marked by hot and noisy subways, honking horns and having to share a room with his little brother. He can't wait to visit his friend Adam in the suburbs for a week. The friends ride bikes around the neighbornhood, fish and catch frogs and sleep outdoors. As the week wears on, though, Jack finds himself missing home. Turning the book upside-down, readers can then find out about Adam's suburban life, with lawns to mow, waiting for rides and an annoying big sister. With this pattern, the tale emphasizes that even though the pair may do the same things, there is no place as familiar and loved as home. Bleck's gouache illustrations perfectly capture the contrasts between the two worlds while simultaneously drawing attention to their similarities—although, regrettably, they miss an opportunity by depicting both boys as white. Readers may just start clamoring for their parents to take them on a trip. (Picture book. 3-8)Read full book review >