Books by Debbie MacKinnon

EYE SPY SHAPES by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2000

"A playful, challenging book that encourages preschoolers to discover the shapes in the world around them. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A series of colorful photographs and computer generated illustrations lead junior sleuths on a search for shapes in this companion to Eye Spy Colors (1998). Read full book review >
WHAT AM I? by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"This team makes child's play of going to work. (Picture book. 1-5)"
From the creators of What Size? (p. 388), a catalog of role models guaranteed to have preschoolers begging for rereadings. Read full book review >
WHAT SIZE? by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1995

"Adults may think they've seen it all before, but Sieveking's engaging, multiracial cast of children absorbed in play is dressed in colors as bright and sparkling as a bowl of Jell-O, and the book goes down just as easily. (Picture book. 2-5)"
MacKinnon and Sieveking have collaborated on a crisply designed look at comparisons (the companion titles are What's Inside?, What Color?, What Shape?, How Many?, and What Noise?). Read full book review >
WHAT NOISE? by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A simple concept, developed with unusual creativity and style. (Picture book. 1-5)"
With several innovative, photo-illustrated concept books to their credit (How Many?, 1993), this British team is moving right up there with such masters of the genre as Bruce McMillan and Margaret Miller. Read full book review >
HOW MANY? by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"A decorative endpaper recapitulation completes this intelligently conceived, unusually attractive offering. (Picture book. 1-5)"
A deceptively simple counting book, illustrated with bright photos crisply silhouetted on a white ground. Read full book review >
WHAT SHAPE? by Debbie MacKinnon
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1992

"A simple but exemplary concept book, put together with unusual care and intelligence. (Picture book. 1-5)"
Eight shapes—diamond, oval, heart, etc.—are explored in crisp, attractive color photos: on the left, a single picture shows a child with a large object of a particular shape (Grace with a rectangular gift; Gemma in a triangular tent); at the right, familiar objects extend the idea (a starfish has five points, while the star-shaped cookies here have six). Read full book review >

"Ten little babies, sitting in a line" (in a carriage, strollers, and on the ground); a folded page opens to reveal that "One toppled over. . .then there were NINE." Read full book review >