Books by Deborah Blum

Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah Blum is a professor of science journalism at the University of Wisconsin. She worked as a newspaper science writer for twenty years, winning the Pulitzer in 1992 for her writing about primate research, which she turned into a


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Released: Feb. 22, 2010

"Caviar for true-crime fans and science buffs alike."
The rollicking story of the creation of modern forensic science by New York researchers during the Prohibition era. Read full book review >
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Released: Aug. 7, 2006

"A useful but oddly uncritical summary."
An account of fin-de-siècle investigations into the murky worlds and weird works of mediums, mesmerists, rhabdomancers and spiritualists. Read full book review >
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Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"A sympathetic and evenhanded treatment of Harlow's life and work—and an absorbing look at 19th- and 20th-century notions of child psychology."
Pulitzer-winning science journalist Blum (Journalism/Univ. of Wisconsin; Sex on the Brain, 1997, etc.) offers a biography of an innovative, controversial psychologist. Read full book review >
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Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"So the mix of sex and politics is ever-present, and Blum's book is a fine reminder of how inevitable—for better or worse— that mix seems to be. (Author tour)"
To the growing genre of gender-behavior books, add Pulitzer Prize winner Blum's (The Monkey Wars, 1994) take on sex differences. Read full book review >
THE MONKEY WARS by Deborah Blum
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Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"But she brings the issues into sharp, disturbing focus."
A penetrating look at the bitter controversy between animal rights activists and research scientists over the use of monkeys and chimpanzees in medical research. Read full book review >