Books by Doug Johnson

SUBSTITUTE TEACHER PLANS by Doug Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

A classroom teacher himself, Johnson (James and the Dinosaurs, 1995) pays tribute to the resourcefulness of substitutes. When weary Miss Huff accidentally leaves her own wish list for vacation—rather than a class schedule—on her desk before taking a day off, her replacement Mrs. Martin takes it at face value. She follows the list, organizing without apparent effort, trips to the amusement park, beach, and ski slope, scuba and sky-diving expeditions, and for a grand finale, a visit to the circus—where she reveals that her other job is Lion Tamer. The children, all wide-eyed, rubber-limbed clay figurines in Smith's candy-colored illustrations using clay, acrylic, collage, and Photoshop, have a terrific time though in the end are just as happy to have Miss Huff back. She's all rested after following the list for the substitute having had a lovely time reading aloud to her cat, playing Scrabble (spelling), playing hopscotch (recess), and paying bills (math). What would Viola Swamp think? (Picture book. 7-9)Read full book review >
NEVER RIDE YOUR ELEPHANT TO SCHOOL by Doug Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

With straight faces and high spirits, Johnson and Carter (Never Babysit the Hippopotamuses!, 1993) offer reasons for the command of the title, e.g., ``Elephants are good at math and love to give answers. While waiting to be called on, your elephant might get excited and wiggle around in his chair. Elephants can really wiggle!'' The understated wit of the text is comically complemented by the zany watercolors of wreaked havoc. Both the words and art make use of every opportunity to mock teachers, but it's all in good fun. (Picture book. 4-6) Read full book review >
NEVER BABYSIT THE HIPPOPOTAMUSES! by Doug Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

What if you were a small boy—say, a rather slender-looking eight-year-old—babysitting a couple of hippos who behaved like rambunctious children? That's the slight idea here, but it's developed into a book that will amuse kids with its exaggerations of their own behavior, plus some incongruities special to hippos (``Don't play leapfrog with them, they can be hard to jump over. Don't play horsey either. They always want you to be the horsey''). From a game of hide-and-seek to bath-splashing, book- reading, and tucking in (more than once), the proceedings are considerably enhanced by Carter's free-form watercolors, where the hippos—who are a luscious shade of green—cavort in a house in which every normally straight line (door-frame, banister, drawer) is as energetically warped as a twanging rubber band. (Picture book. 4-8) Read full book review >