Books by Douglas Coupland

WORST. PERSON. EVER. by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2014

"Did we need transgressive fiction offered as arch comedy? It's a bit like Irvine Welsh writing a sitcom."
A secondary-unit camera operator is recruited by a production company to help film a reality TV show on a remote island in the Pacific Ocean. Guess what? He's not a very nice person. Read full book review >
GENERATION A  by Douglas Coupland
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Generation X with less snark, less plot and much less interesting characters."
Five iconoclasts are drawn together by their reactions to an extraordinary bee sting. Read full book review >
THE GUM THIEF by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Like watching someone with multiple-personality disorder have a midlife crisis."
A big-box chain store is the setting for depressing existential reflection in the latest from Coupland (JPod, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >
JPOD by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2006

""J" is for juvenile, jaundiced, joyless, jumbled junk."
Bored and zany computer programmers think of themselves as characters in a Douglas Coupland novel. Read full book review >
ELEANOR RIGBY by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"Extremely funny yet quite moving (and even plausible): could be one of the first great novels of the new century."
A remembrance of things past that turns inexplicably into a harbinger of the apocalypse—as well as Coupland's (Hey Nostradamus!, 2003, etc.) weirdest and most accomplished work to date. Read full book review >
HEY NOSTRADAMUS! by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2003

"It's not that Coupland can't conceptualize with more significance than is on display here; it's just that he seems not to want to. Cleanly written but lacking steam."
A quartet of monologues about the aftermath of a high-school mass shooting. Read full book review >
ALL FAMILIES ARE PSYCHOTIC by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2001

"Little evocative description, even less character development: this time out, Coupland settles for improbable adventures inspired by middle-of-the-night channel surfing."
A thin, occasionally maudlin poke at the pharmaceutical industry. Read full book review >
MISS WYOMING by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2000

Coupland's fifth novel modishly matures the generation he christened (Generation X, 1991) via a lonely pair of thirtyish Hollywood burnouts in search of meaning. Read full book review >

GIRLFRIEND IN A COMA by Douglas Coupland
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1998

The writer who gave a generation its well-deserved ``X'' returns to the quasi-theological themes of his third novel, Life After God (1994), and again wanders off into spacey, New Age platitudes about death and transcendence. Although God makes no personal appearances here, He's represented by the ghost of an 18-year-old football player whose life touched all the aimless souls wandering through this media- literate narrative. Read full book review >

MICROSERFS by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1995

Gen-X guru Coupland's (Life after God, 1994, etc.) third offering is a sprawling, amiable novel filled with the deracinated underachievers who have given their author both audience and theme. Although Daniel Underwood (alias danielu@microsoft.com.) has his hands somewhat less than full, he hardly counts as a slacker. Read full book review >

LIFE AFTER GOD by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

Professional pulse-taker Coupland (Generation X, Shampoo Planet) here presumes to speak for and to a generation raised without religion. Read full book review >

SHAMPOO PLANET by Douglas Coupland
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

Still a cultural pulse-taker, Coupland (Generation X, 1991) organizes his hip bromides and next-wave sententiousness into a rather humdrum narrative that's long on posturing, short on plot. Laughing at disaster, Coupland's post-post-baby-boomers rationalize the culture of constant change, self-reinvention, and immediate gratification. Read full book review >