Books by Douglas Holgate

THE LAST KIDS ON EARTH AND THE COSMIC BEYOND by Max Brallier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 18, 2018

"Kids who already dig the series will probably like this one. (Horror. 8-12)"
Jack Sullivan and his friends battle interdimensional evil in a Cthulhu-inspired Christmas special. Read full book review >
CLEM HETHERINGTON AND THE IRONWOOD RACE by Jen Breach
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2018

"Indiana Jones meets Mad Max in a whirlwind as exciting for teens as it is for middle-grade readers. (Graphic science fiction. 10-16)"
Young archaeologists Clem and her android brother enter a dangerous race to find priceless artifacts. Read full book review >
THE LAST KIDS ON EARTH AND THE ZOMBIE PARADE by Max Brallier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An apocalyptic adventure with a whole lot of heart. (Horror. 8-12)"
Thirteen-year-old Jack Sullivan and his crew of monster-fighting besties are fresh off their victorious battle against the evil Blarg, but there's no rest for the weary in the middle of a Monster Apocalypse. Read full book review >
THE LAST KIDS ON EARTH by Max Brallier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Classic action-packed, monster-fighting fun. (Horror. 8-12)"
It's been 42 days since the Monster Apocalypse began, and 13-year-old Jack Sullivan, a self-proclaimed "zombie-fighting, monster-slaying tornado of cool" is on a quest to find and rescue his not-so-secret crush, June Del Toro, whether she needs it, wants it, or not. Read full book review >
CHEESIE MACK IS RUNNING LIKE CRAZY! by Steve Cotler
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2013

"Cheesie announces Volume 4 with a tantalizing list of what to expect, so the fun's not over yet. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Middle school has Cheesie Mack on the run. Read full book review >
SUPER-DRAGON by Steven Kroll
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

A dragon contest is announced. There will be fire-breathing competitions and flying acrobatics. Young Drago wants in on the action, but his sister says he's too little, his mother reminds him that he doesn't know how to fly, his father counsels that next year he will be bigger. But Drago has pluck. With the help of Tweet the bird, he not only learns how to use his wings (which is akin to learning how to ride a bicycle—after many false starts, it just happens), but becomes a veritable demon of the sky. Holgate's comic-book-style illustrations, featuring primordial landscapes through which Drago moves with high octane, lighten this straightforward lesson in perseverance, but readers will have some obvious questions about Drago's circumstances. Why didn't Drago's family give him at least a chance to learn to fly, since clearly he was ready? Why did he have to learn to fly at night? And why did Drago feel it necessary to hide his newfound talent from his family? It all feels strangely furtive when it should be the natural course of things. Yet it is gratifying that Drago exceeds all expectations by zipping through a snappy series of figure 8s, while his family can do no better than figure 5s, 7s and 9s. Nyah, nyah, nyah, naysayers. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >