Books by Eds. of TIME for Kids

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 30, 2018

"Reasonably inclusive if parochial in geographic scope and with a message that Aretha Franklin puts most pithily: 'We're coming.' (index) (Collective biography. 10-13)"
Thirty-two living women with "firsts" to their credit offer reflections and attitude. Read full book review >
HEROES OF BLACK HISTORY  by Eds. of TIME for Kids
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 19, 2017

"A solid volume on these four great black trailblazers, but the thumbnail biographies of other notable figures at the end beg the question, isn't it time for lesser-known heroes to have their moment to shine? (timelines, glossary, index) (Collective biography. 9-14)"
Biographies of Harriet Tubman, Jackie Robinson, Rosa Parks, and former President Barack Obama in one volume. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2006

One of the latest in the Science Scoops series, this is a level 3 intended for confident readers. Organization is one of the stronger points. Information about volcanoes is presented in four short chapters. Chapter one introduces volcano vocabulary and basic facts, and includes a cross-sectional diagram. The second chapter profiles the work of volcanologists. Some of the world's more famous volcanoes and the Ring of Fire are the focus of chapter three. Finally, the fourth chapter looks at ways people have learned to live with volcanoes, harnessing their power for positive uses. Young readers will be especially fascinated by the list of quick factoids found at the back. While vocabulary is defined within the text, a "Words to Know" section recaps their meanings. Stunning photographs that are well-labeled will attract a wide audience. Unfortunately, there is no bibliography or list of resources for further reading—flaws that are common in this and other series produced by TIME. Both a good starting point for learning about volcanoes and an easy-reader resource for information. (Nonfiction. 7-9)Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 2006

This attractively designed, if routine, biography of Bell combines period photos on each page with a simply phrased account that notes the inventor's lifelong interest in working with deaf people along with his development of the telephone, several other sound-related devices and even an airplane. Side boxes look at the Industrial Revolution, the Centennial Exhibition and similar contemporary topics, and the author closes with both a timeline and a three-question interview with Bill Gates. As this does convey a sense of what the man was like, as well as an overview of his accomplishments and importance, it will be a useful addition to the array of assignment-fodder bios already on the shelf—despite minor errors (no, Bell did not coin the term "greenhouse effect") and the lack of either source citations or resources for further study. (Nonfiction. 8-10)Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

An initial look at the greatest of all First Ladies, illustrated with small period photos and supplemented by sidebars on topics as diverse as Child Labor and the birth of the UN. El Nabli writes in simple language, not glossing over Eleanor's unhappy childhood, her father's alcoholism or her increasingly distant relationship with FDR, but focusing more on her long, energetic advocacy of social issues, and particularly her involvement in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A brief interview with an ER scholar closes this inspirational mini-portrait. Invitingly designed as well as reasonably frank, it makes an appealing, if superfluous, alternative to the plethora of similar profiles for this audience. (Biography. 9-11)Read full book review >
SPIDERS! by Eds. of TIME for Kids
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

A visually arresting design scheme and stunning, high-quality photographs captivate the reader in this fluency-level entry for "confident readers" in the new TIME for Kids Science Scoops series. Engaging design elements include a variety of colored typefaces for chapter titles and heads, brightly colored diagrams and fact boxes and a coordinating photographic border at the top of each page to delineate chapter changes. The text is written in simple, clear language and covers basic anatomy, reproduction, webs, prey and behavior. A short interview with a spider expert is included, along with a glossary of terms. Classroom teachers will find this useful for beginning research reports, for classroom reading groups and for independent reading, and the volume will also serve younger children well as an introduction to spiders. Kids who like insects will be entranced by the photographs, and even children who don't like spiders may find this an effective antidote to arachnophobia. (Easy reader/nonfiction. 5-7)Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

An adequate biography of the 26th president is one of four biographies in the vanguard of a new series linked to TIME for Kids. Punctuated by rather too many exclamation points, simple declarative sentences take readers through TR's life (continually referring to him as "Teddy" despite disclosing that he hated that name), with occasional sidebars offering little tidbits (such as the origin of the teddy bear and Roosevelt's legacy of conservation). For all its breathlessness, the text does a creditable job of explaining such concepts as monopolies to its upper-elementary audience (but it does struggle with the creation of the Panama Canal), and the illustrations are lavish—at least two to a spread. As nonfiction, however, it falls far short of minimal standards of documentation, lacking even a bibliography. It gets the job done for the most part, and it looks good while doing it, but one is forced to wonder whether the world really needs another just-adequate series of cookie-cutter branded biographies for kids—perhaps "the editors of TIME for Kids®" might consider this before churning out still more. (Nonfiction. 7-10)Read full book review >