Books by Edward Hower

Edward Hower worked for several years as a counselor with troubled teenagers in reform schools and group homes in New York and California. He is the author of nine books, including the novels The New Life Hotel and A Garden of Demons, as well as The Pomeg


THE STORMS OF MAY by Edward Hower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 2005

"Solid, old-fashioned fiction updated with frank language, sex, and an underclass milieu: a natural for any reading group not wedded to middle-class domestic dramas."
A new arrival shakes up a group home for at-risk teenagers, in this strongly plotted and characterized latest from veteran Hower (A Garden of Demons, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
A GARDEN OF DEMONS by Edward Hower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 2003

"Lively but familiar, despite the lunge for the exotic."
Hower's sixth (Shadows and Elephants, 2001, etc.) continues his exploration of Asia, this time in the story of a Sri Lankan girl's complicated coming of age. Read full book review >
SHADOWS AND ELEPHANTS by Edward Hower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"The seething mood and weather of India are captured memorably, but Hower never quite gives his main characters enough inner fire to account for their remarkable success."
The ferment of ideas that was colonial India is richly suggested in the latest from Hower (Queen of the Silver Dollar, 1997; etc.), who retells the story of Theosophical Society founders Madame Blavatsky and Colonel Olcott in their 19th-century quest for a legitimate home for spiritualist beliefs. Read full book review >
QUEEN OF THE SILVER DOLLAR by Edward Hower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"An inoffensive fairy tale, then, of speedy healing and plain-talking young love."
From novelist Hower (Night Train Blues, 1996, etc.), a generous but unconvincing portrait of a fragile cowgirl who finds love at rehab. Read full book review >
NIGHT TRAIN BLUES by Edward Hower
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1996

"Vivid and convincing, but ultimately so inert as to seem pointless."
A nostalgic amble down the overgrown paths of an unhappy childhood, from the Ithaca novelist whose earlier, hard-boiled voice (Wolf Tickets, 1986, etc.) seems suddenly to have gone all runny and soft. Read full book review >