Books by Eida de la Vega

RAINBOW WEAVER / TEJEDORA DEL ARCORIS by Linda Elovitz Marshall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2016

"A buoyant, accessible, if simplified tribute to Mayan weaving. (glossary, author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)"
A resourceful Maya girl crafts rainbow-colored fabric out of recycled plastic bags in this modest tale of ingenuity. Read full book review >
VEGETABLE DREAMS/HUERTO SOÑADO by Dawn Jeffers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

After Erin tells her parents of her dream of having a beautiful vegetable garden, they disappoint her by telling her that she's too young to take on such responsibility. But her retired neighbor, Mr. Martinez, agrees to let Erin have her own section of his garden, as long as she will learn and work. As the plants grow over the summer, so does the intergenerational friendship, and everyone, including Erin's parents, is pleased with the fresh food added to the diet. Schneider's warm pastels are rich and the results pleasing, except for facial features that are not really suited to the blunt edges of pastels. Both English and Spanish texts are smooth and competent, printed on the left-hand pages facing the full-page illustrations. An additional title, this is most suited for large collections or those in which gardening or bilingual titles are especially needed. (Picture book. 5-8)Read full book review >
OCEAN WHISPER/SUSURRO DEL OÉANO by Dennis Rockhill
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2005

A young boy, his room decorated with a poster of whales hanging next to his small fish tank, prepares for sleep listening to a seashell, feeding his fish and staring meditatively into space. As he dreams, the fish leave the tank, the whales swim off his poster and he becomes a mer-boy, joining the underwater world for a night of freedom. Rockhill precedes his wordless picture book with a free-verse poem (in both English and Spanish) that sums up in a general fashion what follows. Rockhill's main illustrations are richly colored, detailed and well executed, but are also heightened in a way not unlike idealized scenes from greeting cards or Thomas Kinkade's paintings. Each is accompanied by three smaller pencil illustrations providing subplot information. Skillful but overly sentimental, the artwork will appeal to some and turn others away. (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2005

A young boy is convinced that an alien invasion from outer space has already occurred: The invaders are insects. He notes their modes of transport (flying and diving), their robotic legs and shiny suits, their eyes like cameras and their underground homes—their overall similarity to aliens on television. The short text is printed in large friendly letters, English above and Spanish below, facing full-page illustrations. Leick's paintings feature life-like and often quite enlarged insects, shadowy settings, and just enough humor to avoid real fright. Not an essential purchase, but one sure to be popular in larger collections. (vocabulary list) (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
TITO, THE FIREFIGHTER/TITO, EL BOMBERO by Tim Hoppey
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2005

Tito, a bilingual boy who lives in East Harlem, dreams of riding on the fire truck. His dream comes true one day when the firefighters need help understanding a neighborhood man who cannot speak English. Despite the title, Hoppey's story is not truly bilingual, but is rather told in English with Spanish words and phrases worked in seamlessly. The main plotline is conventional, though the story has the benefit of suggesting the value of bilingualism. Hoffman's illustrations, on the other hand, are special. Heightened, almost surrealistically sharp details produce a photographic quality that contrasts beautifully with pale background tones and scenes blurring off into the distance as the fire truck speeds by. Others have the sharpness of animated movie cels. A perfectly acceptable story elevated by first-rate artwork. (vocabulary list) (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
OH, CRUMPS!/¡AY CARAMBA! by Lee Bock
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2003

Beautiful illustrations—humorous, busy, matte-surfaced, revealing the canvas texture of the original acrylic paintings—highlight this twisting account of a farmer's attempt to get a good night's sleep. Before he can nod off, the young goats start bleating after having been left out. When farmer Felandro goes out to pen them up, he accidentally wakes the dogs, which wait until he returns to bed to begin howling. Each attempt to get some peace and quiet creates another reason for noise, providing children with a series of pleasurable instances of repetition and predictability. Besides the humor provoked by Felandro's grumbling, children will also enjoy the way he continually confuses tomorrow's tasks as he tries to settle down—does he milk the cow or the silo? Does he mow the hay or the fence? Both Spanish and English texts flow smoothly and may even introduce a few unfamiliar farm terms to some readers. Midgett's illustrations are reminiscent of Joe Cepeda's rowdy, good-humored style and serve to prove useful at story time and in farm units for primary-grade students. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >