Books by Emily Lisker

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Narrative oddities aside, this is nevertheless a worthwhile introduction for younger children. (biographical summary, glossary) (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
A picture-book treatment of the life of Marc Chagall treads a familiar path: The artist, a genius out of step with the ordinariness of life around him, finds his niche, moving from shtetl to art school to Paris, and ultimately to worldwide acclaim. Read full book review >
PLEASE, MALESE! by Amy MacDonald
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 28, 2002

"Readers can start here to get a taste of this particular trickster tradition and then go on to find other tales about Ti Malice. (author's note) (Folktale. 6-9)"
The stories of Haiti are filled with the deeds of the clever, sly Ti Malice and his acquaintance Bouki, whose wits are not as nimble. Read full book review >
THE STORY OF SHABBAT by Molly Cone
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 2000

"A lyrical, sensitive text is not served well by its new illustrations. (Nonfiction. 6-8)"
This republication of a 1966 text with new illustrations explains the Jewish Sabbath. Read full book review >
JUST REWARDS by Steve Sanfield
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Best of all, the stingy farmer's bald lunar pate provides a good forecast of his fate. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
In a folktale that bears the subtitle ``Or Who Is That Man in the Moon and What's He Doing Up There Anyway?,'' a kind farmer is rewarded for rescuing an injured bird, with a magic seed that grows into watermelons loaded with money and jewels. Read full book review >
STRUDEL, STRUDEL, STRUDEL by Steve Sanfield
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1995

"A uniquely funny book. (Picture book/folklore. 4-7)"
A tale about Chelm—a town celebrated in Jewish folklore for the legendary idiocy of its inhabitants. Read full book review >
PUNCH WITH JUDY by Avi
by Avi, illustrated by Emily Lisker
ADVENTURE
Released: April 30, 1993

"Lisker's incisively sketched figures lighten the format. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In a dark tale like the verso of one of Sid Fleischman's comic adventures of traveling performers, Avi explores the idea that great clowns derive power from a profound sense of the tragic. Read full book review >