Books by Emily Smith Pearce

SLOWPOKE by Emily Smith Pearce
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

This entertaining early reader features Fiona, a girl who really, really likes to stop and smell the roses. Fiona goes through her day in slow motion, taking her time as she gets ready for school, eats dinner, feeds the dog and takes a bath. Her family, on the other hand, lives in fast-forward mode and thrives on multitasking. Frustrated with Fiona's slowness, her parents send her to Speed School, where the class motto is: "The less I see, the faster I will be." Being super speedy does not suit Fiona, so she decides to conduct Slow School for her clan. Her counter-slogan: "[T]he more I see, the better my day will be." In the end, Fiona and her family all learn to operate both slowly and speedily, though Fiona still prefers to take her time. The text is interspersed with black-and-white illustrations that do a stellar job of conveying both leisure and frenzy. A clever early reader with challenging vocabulary and some food for thought to boot. (Early reader. 6-9)Read full book review >
ISABEL AND THE MIRACLE BABY by Emily Smith Pearce
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

Eight-year-old Isabel has a new baby sister, a "miracle baby," because her mother is a recent cancer survivor. Now she has to share her room, be extra quiet and help care for the baby. Her family has moved from a home she loved and her father now has a job that often takes him away. Troubles at school and difficulty making friends make everything even worse. Do her parents love the baby more than her? Will her mother's cancer return? Will she ever have a best friend? She feels confused, angry, neglected and frightened. She isn't able to voice her concerns, so she acts out and gets into a ton of trouble. Her parents aren't perfect and all knowing; they are fumbling through all the changes also, and are not aware of how it all appears to Isabel. Although the character of Ben, who turns out to be an important catalyst in the dénouement, is vague and undeveloped, Pearce truly understands how a young child views the world and conveys Isabel's thoughts and frustrations with compassion. A fine debut. (Fiction. 8-10)Read full book review >