Books by Emma Dodson

HOOEY HIGGINS AND THE TREMENDOUS TROUSERS by Steve Voake
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 22, 2014

"Lots of laughs and hijinks make this fast-paced series great for readers with a sophisticated funny bone. (Chapter book. 7-11)"
Best buddies Hooey and Twig are back, this time competing in a contest to invent something that will make the world a safer place. Read full book review >
HOOEY HIGGINS AND THE SHARK by Steve Voake
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2012

"Fast-paced fun. (Chapter book. 7-12)"
Best friends Hooey and Twig go to great lengths to raise money to buy a giant chocolate egg. Read full book review >
SPECKLE THE SPIDER by Emma Dodson
ADVENTURE
Released: July 1, 2010

Driven by dreams of dancing his way to stardom, a self-absorbed Bahamas spider hops a bunch of bananas bound for the mainland. Pairing up with species-mate Suzy, "who could do a pretty good somersault," Speckle quickly becomes the toast of the local zoo—until, suddenly weary of the limelight, he heads home (with Suzy passively following), concluding "it wasn't the cameras and fan mail that made him feel special anymore. It was his family and friends." Despite an applied layer of fuzz on the front cover, Speckle is as two dimensional as his silent mate/dancing partner, and though the capering arachnids in Dodson's energetic illustrations are joined by an attached booklet of spider facts, other documents in envelopes and a closing double foldout, neither Speckle nor his aspirations are likely to win the sort of reader attention and sympathy that Marsha Diane Arnold's Prancing, Dancing Lily (illustrated by John Manders, 2004), Carolyn Crimi's Tessa's Tip-Tapping Toes (illustrated by Marsha Gray Carrington, 2002) and like tales of would-be terpsichoreans earn. (Picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >
BADLY DRAWN DOG by Emma Dodson
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2005

Badly Drawn Dog decides he needs a new look and ends up in an amusing makeover nightmare. Tired of his "scribbly, scrawly, and sketchy" appearance, Badly Drawn Dog yearns to be "drawn properly." He explains his predicament to the local artist who erases Badly Drawn Dog and reincarnates him as a Cubist canine. But Badly Drawn Dog's sharp feet and misaligned eyes cause problems so he returns to the artist for a different look. This time the artist casts Badly Drawn Dog as a mass of "blobs and swirls," and even his pal Doodle the Poodle doesn't recognize him. So Badly Drawn Dog asks the artist for a more popular look and winds up resembling every dog he meets. In the end, Badly Drawn Dog realizes he was much better off being his own badly drawn self. Brilliant, childlike illustrations reinforce the "art" theme and comically capture Badly Drawn Dog's extreme makeovers. Witty and winsome. (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >