Books by Eric Brace

YOU'RE PULLING MY LEG! by Pat Street
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2016

"Knee-slappers on every page for tenderfoot readers and writers. (index) (Informational picture book. 6-9)"
From "lamebrain" to "feet of clay," a heaping handful of English idioms, similes, metaphors, and other colorful turns of phrase. Read full book review >
PLEASE WRITE IN THIS BOOK by Mary Amato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 15, 2006

When a teacher leaves an enticingly blank book in a corner, it becomes a record of classroom rivalries, diplomacy and growth in this deceptively lighthearted offering from the creator of the Riot Brothers. In a variety of handwritten-style entries festooned with childlike drawings, bossy Lizzy and brash Luke ("rhymes with puke") go head-to-head as animal-loving Keesha, meek Yoshiko, budding engineer Milton and others chime in. Slowly, the gross-out remarks, outraged responses, pleas for amity, wild tall tales, authentically lame verse and sycophantic comments take on a different character. By the end, everyone—even initially aliterate Jimmy—is on the same page, enthusiastically taking turns contributing to a collectively composed story about rescuing the teacher from alien kidnappers. Along with warming the cockles of any educator's heart, this record of successful class dynamics will draw reluctant readers with its funny dialogue and please fans of Kate Klise's illustrated romps. (Fiction. 9-11)Read full book review >
THE KRAZEES by Sam Swope
by Sam Swope, illustrated by Eric Brace
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 3, 1997

"Suitably wild homage: Should the Cat in the Hat be occupied elsewhere, this may fit the bill. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Iggie and her jellybean-nosed tiger cat approach terminal boredom on a rainy day—until a herd of striped, checked, polka- dotted, pop-eyed Krazees spring from the drawers, cupboards, and other hiding places to gambol destructively about the house. Read full book review >
MY BROTHER IS FROM OUTER SPACE by Vivian Ostrow
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

For readers who also suspect their siblings are aliens from another planet: Meet Alex, the narrator of this book of evidence against his brother's being human. The facts: As a baby, William babbled; he is from a family of short people but is tall; he never mastered the human art of sleeping calmly in a bed. Alex presents his evidence to his parents, who give him the brush; not until Alex is about to depart for college do the brothers confront each other, when it turns out that William has been nursing his own suspicions about Alex. The concluding illustration shows William with antennae and a cerulean complexion. The text, in a typeface that approximates hand-lettering, flows comfortably into the goofy, friendly illustrations, which convey the playful sentiments of the story. It may inspire similar investigations in many households. (Picture book. 5-9) Read full book review >