Books by Frank Lentricchia

THE DOG KILLER OF UTICA by Frank Lentricchia
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 22, 2014

"Lentricchia (Literature/Duke; The Book of Ruth, 2005, etc.) writes great scenes and sentences, and several of the characters—especially a tough-girl bodyguard, a right-wing radio ranter and Conte's precocious 13-year-old neighbor—are keepers. Just don't expect a rush of satisfaction when this scruffy, elegiac dance comes to an end."
Dogs aren't the only victims of upstate New York's latest murderer, but they're certainly the most perplexing. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF RUTH by Frank Lentricchia
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"An extravagantly far-fetched novel that ogles celebrity even as it professes artistic detachment."
A world-class photographer has close calls in Fidel's Havana and Saddam's Baghdad in the latest from novelist/critic Lentricchia (Crimes of Art and Terror, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
LUCCHESI AND THE WHALE by Frank Lentricchia
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

A hybrid of literary comment and fictional creation, this latest from critic, memoirist, and novelist Lentricchia (Johnny Critelli and The Knifemen, 1996) perfectly captures the voice of the critic agonistes: the once-detached scholar no longer hiding, or hiding behind, his judgments and values. Read full book review >
JOHNNY CRITELLI and THE KNIFEMEN by Frank Lentricchia
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Sometimes he succeeds."
A welcome advance over his messy and confessional Edge of Night (1994), these two novellas by the Duke literary theorist still bear the signs of someone who's spent much of his career thinking about fiction, not creating it. Read full book review >
THE EDGE OF NIGHT by Frank Lentricchia
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Next time, think clarity and focus."
Once called ``the Dirty Harry of contemporary literary theory,'' Lentricchia (Duke) proves something of a postmodern wimp in this annoying, enervating memoir of his life as a critic (successful) and family man (failure). Read full book review >