Books by Frans de Waal

MAMA'S LAST HUG by Frans de Waal
Released: March 12, 2019

"De Waal turns his years of research into a delightful and illuminating read for nonscientists, a book that will surely make readers want to grab someone's arm and exclaim, 'Listen to this!'"
Once again, the eminent primatologist takes readers deep into the world of animals to show us that we humans are not the unique creatures we like to think we are. Read full book review >
THE BONOBO AND THE ATHEIST by Frans de Waal
NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 2013

"A well-composed argument for the biological foundations of human morality."
Is morality a learned aspect of human nature, or is it innate? Are thinking and acting morally behaviors exclusive to humans? Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 2009

"An appealing celebration of our better nature."
What other primates can teach us about human nature. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 2005

"Fascinating and enlightening: It's hard not to conclude that, in many ways, apes may be wiser than their upright relatives."
Apes are our nearest relatives, and we have far more in common with them than we realize. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"An extremely well-written, highly provocative discussion of the origins and meaning of culture."
Humans have no monopoly on culture or ethics, argues a respected expert on our animal cousins. Read full book review >
BONOBO by Frans de Waal
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"A fascinating, delightfully successful treatment of an arresting creature. (75 color photos, 9 b&w photos, 9 maps and drawings)"
Notes toward an understanding of the bonobo, Africa's most elusive primate, from the always engaging de Waal, a noted primatologist (Good Natured, 1996). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1996

"Unpretentious, open, humorous, and with a flair for language, de Waal nimbly displays that rare and wonderful scientific mind: as much at home with contradiction, clutter, and illogic as with systematic data."
Can we recognize a sense of morality in creatures other than ourselves? Read full book review >