Books by Gerald Early

BEST AFRICAN AMERICAN FICTION 2010 by Gerald Early
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 29, 2009

"A rich compilation, opening up territory for further exploration."
Running the gamut from accessible crime fiction to experimental efforts by critics' darlings, this ambitious anthology offers a snapshot of modern black culture without being tied to a single theme. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 13, 2009

"Lacking cohesiveness, this will likely lead the curious reader to other books."
The expansive criteria in terms of authors, genres and publication dates (2006-09) makes for a treasure trove of discovery in this volume, though it doesn't hold together as well as so many other best-of anthologies. Read full book review >
BEST AFRICAN AMERICAN ESSAYS: 2009 by Debra J. Dickerson
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 13, 2009

"A cracking good read, something that all too few essay anthologies manage to be."
Inaugural edition of a new series proves that there's always room for another delivery method for quality short nonfiction. Read full book review >
THE MUHAMMAD ALI READER by Gerald Early
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 18, 1998

Early (who also edited the recent Body Language: Writers on Sport, p. 168, etc.) compiles a formidable team of contributors to render honor to a man bigger than boxing, bigger than sports. Read full book review >

BODY LANGUAGE by Gerald Early
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1998

For volume two of Graywolf's Forum series, editor Early (Daughters, 1994, etc.) called for personal essays about an encounter with a sport and what significance that encounter held for the writer. Read full book review >

DAUGHTERS by Gerald Early
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1994

Early's mushy, self-conscious essays recounting discussions with his daughters, poems to them, and diary excerpts have the appeal of a stranger's family album. Indeed, Early (Lure and Loathing, 1993) remains a stranger. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1993

Ninety years after W.E.B. DuBois posited the ``double- consciousness'' of African-Americans (``always measuring one's soul by the tape of the world that looks on in amused contempt and pity'' in a constant experience of ``twoness—an American, a Negro...two unreconciled strivings''), 18 African-American intellectuals offer thoughtful responses. Does ``double-consciousness'' exist? Read full book review >