Books by Glen Duncan

BY BLOOD WE LIVE by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2014

"Duncan's style is animated, and he recounts the imperatives of vampire and werewolf brutality and sexual aggressiveness with particular gusto."
Vampires and werewolves are at it again...and for the most part, they still don't like each other. Read full book review >
TALULLA RISING by Glen Duncan
Released: July 3, 2012

"Duncan leaves no doubt about his commitment to the intellectual and the bestial traditions of werewolves and vampires, for he sustains a tone both brainy and vicious."
Werewolves and vampires are again at each other's throats. Read full book review >
THE LAST WEREWOLF by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2011

"Duncan's writing is quirky and brilliant—and definitely not for kids."
Duncan continues the long tradition of werewolf literature in this harrowing novel of lupine transformation. Read full book review >
A DAY AND A NIGHT AND A DAY by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2009

"The prose is as merciless as the ghastly figure of Harper, whose shadow looms over the book."
Critically esteemed British novelist Duncan (The Bloodstone Papers, 2007, etc.) mixes memory and desire, Kafkaesque surrealism and straightforward narrative in a nightmarish story of love, terror and torture. Read full book review >
THE BLOODSTONE PAPERS by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"A vigorous roman à ghee, reminiscent at turns of Vikram Seth, Zadie Smith and Douglas Coupland."
A talky, pleasing generational novel of divided worlds, blending postmodern conceits with old-fashioned whodunit conventions. Read full book review >
DEATH OF AN ORDINARY MAN by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"The life and times of an ordinary man, with longueurs and lack of drama intact."
Man dies, gets to hover around and check out what the family is up to. Read full book review >
I, LUCIFER by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2003

"Duncan has comic energy to spare but no clear idea of what to do with it. The result reads like a promising first draft."
The Devil is on vacation, sampling life in London and reflecting on some of his career highlights, in this grab bag from the British Duncan (first US publication). Read full book review >
HOPE by Glen Duncan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 28, 1998

A maudlin debut novel by a young Brit about romantic failure, filled with trendy musings on the transgressive (S/M, child abuse, pornography) in contemporary culture. Gabriel Jones, the narrator, offers us a long look back at his impossibly tragic, sordid life. He is currently living in London in a kind of limbo, and he hopes that by mulling over his past failures he can come to grips with the demons that drive him. "Begin with Hope," he tells himself, but he isn—t talking about the emotion. Hope turns out to be the expensive prostitute who gets him over his bouts of despair about Alicia, whose love he betrayed because of Katherine. In fervid, gushy prose—some of it quite good, yards of it over the top—Gabriel delivers what feels like the longest college all-night confessional in history. How he fell in love with Alicia: "Nothing prepared me for soulful sex, sex that didn't retain its lust at the expense of its love, sex . . . with someone I genuinely liked." How Alicia, by deciding to do a feminist study of porn, introduced the worm—a centerfold spread that reminds Gabriel of how, when he was eight years old, he was initiated into sex by next-door neighbor Katherine, who he then witnessed being abused by a pig-mask—wearing father (as Mummy looked on). How Alicia then finds him diddling an on-stage stripper with a cherry lollipop (can't help himself, it's in his childhood). Six years later, Gabriel is offered a chance reunion with the lovely Alicia. But Hope is retiring that very night, and when Gabriel shows up to pay his respects, he happens to be wearing a pig mask (went to a costume party, you know), which shocks Hope into revealing herself as . . . Katherine. Too traumatized to keep his rendezvous with Alicia, Gabriel sinks into his current state of picturesque decline. Unpleasant and unpersuasive: politically correct prudery mixed with unbridled sex. Read full book review >