Books by Gordon S. Wood

FRIENDS DIVIDED by Gordon S. Wood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 24, 2017

"An illuminating history of early Americans that is especially timely in the ugly, partisan-filled age of Trump."
The acclaimed historian engages in a compelling examination of the complex relationship of the Founding Fathers who eventually served as the second and third presidents of the United States. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 16, 2011

"Sound, agenda-free analysis, gracefully presented."
A Pulitzer and Bancroft Prize-winning historian offers deeply contemplative essays from a career devoted to studying the Revolutionary Era. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 17, 2008

"A takeaway point well worth the price of admission, but there are many more in this solid collection. Fruitful reading for academics and history buffs alike."
History teaches little and has scarce influence on the present. So why bother to study it at all? Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 22, 2006

"Bracing, clear-eyed perspectives on why we are unlikely to see such a politically creative period again."
In this collection, Pulitzer Prize-winner Wood (History/Brown Univ.; The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin, 2004, etc.) elegantly examines the meaning of the Founding Fathers for our time and—an infinitely harder thing to discern—for their own. Read full book review >
THE AMERICANIZATION OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN by Gordon S. Wood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2004

"An illuminating companion to Walter Isaacson's Benjamin Franklin (2003) and other recent studies that cast the Founder in a new light."
A reluctant revolutionary? A French wannabe? A portrait of Ben Franklin in a decidedly contrarian—though careful—bit of revisionism. Read full book review >
THE RADICALISM OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by Gordon S. Wood
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 14, 1992

"A provocative, highly accomplished examination of how American society was reshaped in the cauldron of revolution."
Perhaps, as is often noted, the American Revolution was not as convulsive or transforming as its French and Russian counterparts. Read full book review >