Books by Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan is the author of nine novels, including Amsterdam, for which he won the Booker Prize in 1998, and Atonement.


SWEET TOOTH by Ian McEwan
Released: Nov. 13, 2012

"Britain's foremost living novelist has written a book—often as drily funny as it is thoughtful—that somehow both subverts and fulfills every expectation its protagonist has for fiction."
A subtly and sweetly subversive novel which seems more characteristic of its author as it becomes increasingly multilayered and labyrinthine in its masterful manipulation of the relationship(s) between fiction and truth. Read full book review >
ON CHESIL BEACH by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2007

"This latest from England's foremost contemporary novelist feels just right."
Size matters. Read full book review >
SATURDAY by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2005

"A sort of middle-class humanist manifesto: when you find yourself fortunate beyond all measure in a random universe, gratitude, generosity, and compassion are a decent response."
An increasingly mellowed but no less gripping McEwan (Atonement, 2002, etc.) portrays a single day in the life of a well-off upper-middle-class Londoner, blessed in every conceivable way. Read full book review >
ATONEMENT by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2002

"With a sweeping bow to Virginia Woolf, McEwan combines insight, penetrating historical understanding, and sure-handed storytelling despite a conclusion that borrows from early postmodern narrative trickery. Masterful. "
McEwan's latest, both powerful and equisite, considers the making of a writer, the dangers and rewards of imagination, and the juncture between innocence and awareness, all set against the late afternoon of an England soon to disappear. Read full book review >
AMSTERDAM by Ian McEwan
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Middle-brow fiction British style, strong on the surface, vapid at the center."
Winner of this year's Booker Prize, McEwan's latest (Black Dogs, 1992; Enduring Love, 1998) is a smartly written tale that devolves slowly into tricks and soapy vapors. Read full book review >
ENDURING LOVE by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Painful and powerful work by one of England's best novelists."
A sad, chilling, precise exploration of deranged love, by the author of, among other works, the novels The Innocent (1990) and Black Dogs (1992). Read full book review >
THE DAYDREAMER by Ian McEwan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 30, 1994

"Novelist McEwan's first book for children contains some magical moments but is marred by being often repetitive and occasionally mean-spirited. (Fiction. 8+)"
Adults think that Peter Fortune is a difficult child because he sits by himself and stares into space. Read full book review >
BLACK DOGS by Ian McEwan
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"His lapidary prose neatly disguises his search for transcendence."
As in McEwan's last novel, The Innocent (1990), the Berlin Wall plays an important symbolic role in this fictional meditation on evil—a pseudo-memoir written from a post-cold-war perspective. Read full book review >
THE INNOCENT by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 25, 1990

"McEwan's clinical account of dismemberment reminds us of the dark imagination displayed in his other work—it's also bound to turn off the wider audience who would otherwise enjoy this clean and clever fiction."
McEwan's latest—his best shot at a popular novel—is something of a departure from his previous work (The Child in Time, The Comfort of Strangers, etc.), but no less skillful in design or execution. Read full book review >
THE CHILD IN TIME by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 1987

"Though intensely cinematic, this subtle and complex novel would require a director of like narrative daring and imaginative genius."
With none of his previous delight in things macabre, McEwan sets a story of domestic horror against a disorienting exploration in time, and ends up with a work of remarkable intellectual and political sophistication—his most expansive and passionate fiction to date. Read full book review >
THE COMFORT OF STRANGERS by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1981

"So, once again, McEwan seems to be a huge talent constricted by the need to preach, philosophize, or work out private obsessions; and one can only hope that writing beguiling but disappointing essay-stories like this one will free him to write more wide-ranging, full-visioned fiction in the future."
The Ian McEwan paradox continues. Read full book review >
IN BETWEEN THE SHEETS by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1979

"With three other fragmentary pieces that don't achieve much impact, this slim collection is hardly McEwan at his best (he remains a writer of tremendous style who seems limited by his obsessions), but at the very least it reinforces his position as the Roald DaM for the sexually-eruptive 1970s."
Seven stories by the gifted author of The Cement Garden (1978), who keeps his deadpan cool while twisting male-female relations into lean, macabre parables—a technique that is always intriguing but only occasionally absorbing. Read full book review >
THE CEMENT GARDEN by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"If he and his characters can stretch to measure up to that prose, we may be watching a major novelist in the making."
There can be nothing but praise for how Ian McEwan writes: in his short stories (First Love, Last Rites, 1975) and in this new novella, he glories in the secret of how uninflected, almost unbearably lean, plain prose can grip, can scream without a single exclamation point. Read full book review >
FIRST LOVE, LAST RITES by Ian McEwan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1975

"Provocation of a sort, but is it really justified by such an overwhelming fetor?"
McEwan is a young Englishman whose first collection of short stories (five have appeared in little magazines) has been compared to Dahl and Collier. Read full book review >