Books by Isadore Seltzer

THE MAN WHO TRICKED A GHOST by Laurence Yep
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

Sung is a man so brave that he thinks nothing of walking home at night, despite his friend's warning. Accosted by a ghost (none of your flimsy European wraiths—this huge, solid-looking warrior has a fiercely craggy visage and "antique armor made of rhinoceros hide with metal scales"), Sung boldly claims to be a ghost, too. Undaunted by the ghost's mission—to scare or kill the overcourageous Sung, whom he doesn't recognize—Sung tricks him at every turn, even getting the ghost to confide that "once we are spat upon we cannot change our shape"—a useful bit of information that in the end not only saves Sung but enriches him. Yep's simple, lively narrative perfectly suits an entertaining trickster tale that, he notes, dates in written form to the third century; Seltzer matches its energy and humor in vibrant, freely rendered paintings that will enthrall listeners as much as the spooky, funny story. A winner. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10) Read full book review >
THE HOUSE I LIVE IN by Isadore Seltzer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1992

Beginning with a Native American pueblo, a sampling of 12 homes that are as different as the eras, climates, and cultural heritages that produced them. An old stone Pennsylvania German farmhouse; one of San Francisco's Victorian ``Painted Ladies''; a small, pre-WW II fake Tudor in the Bronx; a pink stucco confection in L.A.; a houseboat, a trailer, and a fanciful contemporary beach house—all are among those described in an informative text that focuses on construction materials and techniques and how the architecture of each suits its special function. Seltzer's 3/4-spread illustrations are crisp and bright, enlivened with birds, pets, vehicles, and what seem to be retouched photos of kids from Montclair, N.J. pretending that these houses are theirs. An intriguing introduction to the extraordinary diversity of our domestic architecture. (Nonfiction. 7-11) Read full book review >