Books by Jack Kerouac

THE SEA IS MY BROTHER by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2012

"Of interest primarily to scholars and diehard Kerouackers; general readers ought to head to the far more memorable On the Road, The Subterraneans and The Dharma Bums."
A forgotten novel—forgotten, by its author, for a reason—by Beat Generation icon Kerouac. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2011

"An impressive framework for the full-tilt multimedia treatment that, one hopes, will surely follow. Gadget freak and tinkerer Neal Cassady would have dug it."
The Beat Generation's enduring classic dons new high-tech clothes in this excellent digital treatment. Read full book review >
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"More of interest as a literary curio than as a work of art, though shrewd neobopsters will probably want to be seen with copies in hand."
A potboiler by two noted authors written in 1945, long before they were famous, and published now for the first time. Read full book review >
WAKE UP by Jack Kerouac
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 22, 2008

"Kerouac completists will have to have this, of course. Literary-minded students of Buddhism will find Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha to be the more attractive introduction, and devotees will have had this story from many other sources, as Kerouac himself did."
A fan's notes on the Awakened One. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2004

"Brinkley's intelligent choices allow us to see both the familiar Kerouac and a mysterious stranger as well."
An eclectic sampling of the many facets of the legendary peripatetic writer, selected from assorted journals and notebooks Kerouac kept during the time he was working on his first two novels. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2000

"A depressing but fascinating account of one of the sadder figures of modern American letters."
An annotated collection of letters exchanged between novelist Johnson (In the Night Café, 1989, etc.) and Kerouac (1922-69) during the two years (1957-58) of their stormy (and not terribly romantic) love affair. Read full book review >
JACK KEROUAC by Jack Kerouac
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"If you do care, this book is indispensable to your understanding of Kerouac; if you don't, reread his fiction, which is so autobiographical that it at times makes the letters redundant."
The second of a two-volume set of Kerouac's interminable correspondence, containing letters from the publication of On the Road until his death. Read full book review >
ATOP AN UNDERWOOD by Jack Kerouac
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"A curmudgeon might say that, with rare exceptions, teenagers aren't old or experienced enough to create much of real artistic value; Kerouac's early efforts would fit such a maxim."
Kerouac's early writings—from ages 13 to 21—elucidate the formative years and provide insight into the later literature of the author's career. Read full book review >
SOME OF THE DHARMA by Jack Kerouac
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"If you're searching for real Buddhism, pick up Suzuki; if you must indulge your guilty pleasures with more Kerouac, reread On the Road."
More ersatz Buddhism from postwar America's most overrated author. Read full book review >
JACK KEROUAC by Jack Kerouac
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"Its value for scholars shouldn't obscure this terrific volume's broader appeal."
A stunningly rich set of letters that at times reads like a new Kerouac novel. Read full book review >
VISIONS OF CODY by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1972

"Kerouac's failure to encompass 'it' all within that sentence becomes a poignant corollary of that failure of life implicit within the grandiose chronicles of actions without purpose — except their own beauty — of necessity larger than life because life, marvelous as it was, never was quite all it was cracked up to be."
Another posthumous novel by the late subculture hero-author of On the Road, The Dharma Burns, etc., a combination novel-elegy about the beloved Neal Cassady, alias Cody Pomeray, a grand Coloradoan with whom Kerouac (alias lack Deluoscz) drank, smoked, traveled, and endlessly chatted during the late '40's and early '50's, before Cassady died, when Kerouac was first starting to write. Read full book review >
PIC by Jack Kerouac
Released: Sept. 1, 1971

"For old times' sake."
This will be a sad last sentimental trek for those who remember Kerouac as their generation's oracular road guide. Read full book review >
VANITY OF DULUOZ by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 6, 1967

"This section, the longest and best, includes thinly disguised glimpses of Burroughs, drugs, Kerouac's first marriage, homosexuality, and murder—but all done with such boyish elan and roughhouse 'truth' that it seems an engaging Beat fantasia which might even appeal to the lady in Dubuque."
Kerouac has already passed into legend, but the legend grows dimmer with each "new" book. Read full book review >
DESOLATION ANGELS by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 3, 1965

"Angels is lit up with the glare of 'scandal' and, in its exposure of the above members of the avant-beatnik world, may well wing its way to the wide audience the publisher anticipates."
Kerouac's Desolation Angels may be dealt with quickly. Read full book review >
VISIONS OF GERARD by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1963

"And may he find the turn-off on the thruway."
As a writer, Kerouac is becoming more and more like the sad sack who missed the turn-off on the thruway and must now seemingly go on and on until he hits the next one. Read full book review >
BIG SUR by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 1962

"Big Sur is an inverted parody, of a talent and temperament self-destroyed."
In his latest novel, Jack Kerouac, alias Jack Dulouz, awakens all "woebegone and goopy" and hungover in old Frisco. Read full book review >
LONESOME TRAVELER by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 1960

"There's a final essay on the hobo — The Vanishing 'American To his fans and to those who might not be repelled by his frenetic anti-style this might be of intermittent interest."
Broadly speaking, Lonesome Traveler, in form, is a series of impressionistic essays on the author's travels mainly around the U.S. There are accounts of his sojourn in San Pedro and Long Beach, Calif, waiting to get on a ship; riding by bus to Mexico — to the bullfights, out of season — on pot; working as a brakeman on the Southern Pacific R.R.; in the galley of a ship sailing down the Pacific coast to the Mississippi; and his Big Trip to Europe —Tangier, Morocco, Paris, London. Read full book review >
DR. SAX by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 1959

"Kerouac's vocabulary is at its most challenging, and you can cut your teeth on oiky-cloiky, grooking, weyic, groomus, mowurpy and dommerfall."
At one point in this incoherent fugue, Doctor Sax says-"'In my ammenuosis shack, madame' (he chewed viciously on a cud of tobacco and sunk the chawcake in his inner backpockets till later). Read full book review >
DHARMA BUMS by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1958

"There, high on a hilltop, it is revealed, the search ends- and except for those dedicated, nirvana will never have seemed nearer."
Up for air after The Subterraneans- way up (mountain climbing is the new kick) are the Dharma Bums, Ray Smith, Japhy Ryder- a high-domed hepcat, and some of their Zen Lunatic friends who have been chewing their cuds, sipping muscatel, junking, holding Zen Fun Love Orgies (no celibate Buddhists these) in the cellars of San Francisco. Read full book review >
THE SUBTERRANEANS by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 20, 1958

..... live in the alleys of San Francisco- smoking tea- and talking of Wolfe and Baudelaire and Pound and peote- and listening to bop. Read full book review >