Books by James Ponti

CITY SPIES  by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 17, 2020

"It's fine, but it doesn't live up to its potential as a STEM-plus-caper adventure. (Thriller. 8-12)"
This thriller reads like Miss Congeniality meets Kingsman, starring Norwegian climate activist Greta Thunberg and Anishinaabe-kwe water protector Autumn Peltier…kind of. Read full book review >
TRAPPED! by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2018

"A top-shelf test of courage, friendship, and ingenuity. (Mystery. 11-13)"
Seventh-grade sleuths visit their local libraries and unmask a Russian spy ring. Read full book review >
VANISHED! by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A splendid whodunit: cerebral, exhilarating, low in violence, methodical in construction, and occasionally hilarious. (Mystery. 11-13)"
A rash of pranks at an exclusive private school leads two young detectives all the way to the White House. Read full book review >
FRAMED! by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"More escapades are promised in this improbable but satisfying series starter. (Mystery. 9-12)"
A smart kid foils big-time thieves in the nation's capital—and joins the FBI. Read full book review >
BLUE MOON by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Adventure, sleuthing and a NYC travelogue in one quick read. (Horror/fantasy. 8-12)"
Molly and her intrepid team of Omegas continue their fight against the undead of New York City. Read full book review >
DEAD CITY by James Ponti
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A fast-paced read for those who like their zombies with just a little fright. (Horror/fantasy. 8-12)"
Middle schooler Molly excels at judo and fencing—both necessary skills when combatting New York City's 1,000-plus zombies. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 1999

Fans of this new professional sport will have to ease past the forced pitch of these capsule looks at some of the better-known stars of the game. Each biographical note contains the person's vital statistics and an impressing listing of honors. Another section introduces each of the WNBA teams, with rosters, records, and notes; the same attention is given to the upstart American Basketball League. A final section consists of a brief women's basketball trivia quiz. This text feels hastily assembled; Ponti equates a conversational tone with infractions of grammar and lazy transitions. Those who want to know why this sport, which dates back—barely—to 1996, has burst on the scene so quickly and continues to draw crowds, will have to turn to more solid coverage found in national magazines. (Nonfiction. 10-12) Read full book review >