Books by Janet Hutchings

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2007

"Worth collecting, certainly, but shorter would have been so much better."
Twenty-six stories, 15 countries, 11 languages, 7 winners. Read full book review >
CREME DE LA CRIME by Janet Hutchings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"By and large, however, Hutchings's compendium should serve readers well through many a dark and stormy night."
The modern crime story is not just about whodunit anymore. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 10, 1996

"In short, Hutchings's selection of 16 stories from Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 195495, seems to have hit all the high points she missed last time."
A sequel to Hutchings's Once Upon a Crime (1994) that outclasses the original collection in every respect. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1996

"A uniformly rewarding collection for neophytes, though old hands may find themselves restless at the lack of novelty."
EQMM editor Hutchings (Once Upon a Crime, 1994, etc.) sticks close to the obvious in her old master selections: The entries by A.C. Doyle, Baroness Orczy, R. Austin Freeman, G.K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Anthony Gilbert make up as stellar a collection of chestnuts as you'll find. Read full book review >
ONCE UPON A CRIME by Janet Hutchings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 24, 1994

"Compared to McCloy's masterful tale of art, lust, and politics, most of the mysteries here seem content to treat the past as an exotic canvas for the display of the usual suspects."
An anthology of historical detective stories whose execution lags behind its long-overdue concept. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 15, 1993

"Especially interesting for editor Hutchings's image of her tenure at EQMM (since 1991), though it doesn't look as if much has changed at the old place."
Sixteen middling stories, all except Stanley Ellin's peerless reprint—``The Moment of Decision,'' dating from 1991-92. Read full book review >