Books by John B. Keane

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2004

"A rich and delightful feast from an old master."
Seventeen tales from Keane (An Irish Christmas Feast, 2002, etc.), the late and much-lamented Kerry saloonkeeper who was perhaps one of Ireland's best storytellers since Sean O'Faolain. Read full book review >
AN IRISH CHRISTMAS FEAST by John B. Keane
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Corny, trite, and delightful: tales sure to delight anyone who has ever cried over a good rendition of 'Danny Boy'—or passed out at a Pogues concert."
Enough Christmas stories—52 in all—to last the whole year long, each one generously laced with classic Keane blarney (An Irish Christmas, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
AN IRISH CHRISTMAS by John B. Keane
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"He's a man full of love, whatever the season."
Irish author Keane turns his eye from the painful, pathologically blighted lives and worldly and spiritual poverty in villages he described in The Bodhran Makers (1992) and The Ram of God (1996) to far more friendly tales about life in rural Ireland. Read full book review >
THE RAM OF GOD by John B. Keane
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Keane, an Irish storyteller in the best tradition (The Bodhran Makers, 1992, etc.), scants the blarney to tell a tale that resonates with truth and with compassion for a people trapped by poverty—both spiritual and temporal."
Playwright-novelist Keane movingly evokes the pervasive pettiness and prejudice of Irish rural life, blighting dreams and love, in the story of a young man who's destined for the priesthood but is nearly destroyed by gossip, family greed, and his own stubbornness. Read full book review >
THE BODHRAN MAKERS by John B. Keane
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 12, 1992

"A thorough, pained, loving account of a lost world—with the novel itself an act of cultural survival."
Poverty and the Church-led attack on Celtic traditions force 1950's Irish farmers into exile—in a rich, poignant if occasionally heavy-handed novel (first published in 1986 in Ireland) from Keane, who writes a column for the New York-based Irish Echo. Read full book review >